Earth and environmental sciences

Definition

Earth and environmental sciences cover all aspects of Earth and planetary sciences, and broadly encompasses solid Earth processes, surface and atmospheric dynamics, Earth system history, climate and climate change, marine and freshwater systems, and ecology. It also considers the interactions between humans and these systems.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Reviews |

    The evolutionary history of life and the history of the planet itself are closely entwined. This Perspective looks at the sources of energy — geochemical, sunlight, oxygen, flesh and fire — that have shaped this inter-relationship and the course of evolution.

    • Olivia P. Judson
  • Research |

    Accounting for inter- and intraspecies evolutionary relationships is important for conservation planning, but rarely considered in practice. A new framework identifies priority conservation areas accounting for evolutionary diversity.

    • Silvia B. Carvalho
    • , Guillermo Velo-Antón
    • , Pedro Tarroso
    • , Ana Paula Portela
    • , Mafalda Barata
    • , Salvador Carranza
    • , Craig Moritz
    •  & Hugh P. Possingham
  • Research |

    The use of mitomycin C inductions to determine the fraction of lysogenic cells in mixed natural communities is highly variable and insensitive to bacterial host density, suggesting that other methods should be developed and used to measure lysogeny.

    • Ben Knowles
    • , Barbara Bailey
    • , Lance Boling
    • , Mya Breitbart
    • , Ana Cobián-Güemes
    • , Javier del Campo
    • , Rob Edwards
    • , Ben Felts
    • , Juris Grasis
    • , Andreas F. Haas
    • , Parag Katira
    • , Linda Wegley Kelly
    • , Antoni Luque
    • , Jim Nulton
    • , Lauren Paul
    • , Gregory Peters
    • , Nate Robinett
    • , Stuart Sandin
    • , Anca Segall
    • , Cynthia Silveira
    • , Merry Youle
    •  & Forest Rohwer
  • Research |

    The amount of coarse gravel transported out of the Himalayan mountains by rivers is insensitive to catchment size, because the majority of gravel sourced more than 100 kilometres upstream of the mountain front is abraded into sand before it reaches the Ganga Plain.

    • Elizabeth H. Dingle
    • , Mikaël Attal
    •  & Hugh D. Sinclair
    Nature 544, 471–474

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