Planetary science

Definition

Planetary science is the study of the celestial bodies that orbit stars, with a particular focus on our own solar system. This includes studying the formation and evolution of planets, the moons and rings that orbit them, and other smaller bodies such as asteroids and comets.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    In an analysis of a large sample of microlensing events, a few suggest the existence of Earth-mass free-floating planets, but only the expected number of Jupiter-mass free-floating objects were detected.

    • Przemek Mróz
    • , Andrzej Udalski
    • , Jan Skowron
    • , Radosław Poleski
    • , Szymon Kozłowski
    • , Michał K. Szymański
    • , Igor Soszyński
    • , Łukasz Wyrzykowski
    • , Paweł Pietrukowicz
    • , Krzysztof Ulaczyk
    • , Dorota Skowron
    •  & Michał Pawlak
  • Research |

    Creeping subduction zones are unlikely to generate tsunamigenic earthquakes. Analysis of a creeping part of the Alaskan subduction zone reveals fault structures similar to those in Tohoku, suggesting it may host large earthquakes and tsunamis.

    • Anne Bécel
    • , Donna J. Shillington
    • , Matthias Delescluse
    • , Mladen R. Nedimović
    • , Geoffrey A. Abers
    • , Demian M. Saffer
    • , Spahr C. Webb
    • , Katie M. Keranen
    • , Pierre-Henri Roche
    • , Jiyao Li
    •  & Harold Kuehn
  • Research |

    Venus Express wind measurements at Venus’s cloud top during the night show a different picture than dayside. Both fast and slow motions are detected (there are only fast ones during the day) as well as many stationary waves related to surface relief.

    • J. Peralta
    • , R. Hueso
    • , A. Sánchez-Lavega
    • , Y. J. Lee
    • , A. García Muñoz
    • , T. Kouyama
    • , H. Sagawa
    • , T. M. Sato
    • , G. Piccioni
    • , S. Tellmann
    • , T. Imamura
    •  & T. Satoh
  • Research |

    CMIP5 simulations reveal that the frequency of extreme El Niño events doubles under the 1.5 °C Paris target, and continues to increase long after global temperatures stabilize due to emission reductions. Extreme La Niña events, however, see little change at either 1.5° or 2 °C warming.

    • Guojian Wang
    • , Wenju Cai
    • , Bolan Gan
    • , Lixin Wu
    • , Agus Santoso
    • , Xiaopei Lin
    • , Zhaohui Chen
    •  & Michael J. McPhaden

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