Planetary science

Definition

Planetary science is the study of the celestial bodies that orbit stars, with a particular focus on our own solar system. This includes studying the formation and evolution of planets, the moons and rings that orbit them, and other smaller bodies such as asteroids and comets.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    • Karen J. Meech
    • , Robert Weryk
    • , Marco Micheli
    • , Jan T. Kleyna
    • , Olivier R. Hainaut
    • , Robert Jedicke
    • , Richard J. Wainscoat
    • , Kenneth C. Chambers
    • , Jacqueline V. Keane
    • , Andreea Petric
    • , Larry Denneau
    • , Eugene Magnier
    • , Travis Berger
    • , Mark E. Huber
    • , Heather Flewelling
    • , Chris Waters
    • , Eva Schunova-Lilly
    •  & Serge Chastel
  • Research |

    A super-hydrated clay mineral may play an important role in the solid Earth’s water cycle, according to laboratory experiments. The mineral kaolinite can carry and release large amounts of water during subduction.

    • Huijeong Hwang
    • , Donghoon Seoung
    • , Yongjae Lee
    • , Zhenxian Liu
    • , Hanns-Peter Liermann
    • , Hyunchae Cynn
    • , Thomas Vogt
    • , Chi-Chang Kao
    •  & Ho-Kwang Mao
  • Research |

    Limitations with climate models have previously prevented accurate diagnosis of future changes in mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). A convection-permitting model now indicates that summer MCSs will triple by 2100 in the United States, with a corresponding increase in rainfall rates and areal extent.

    • Andreas F. Prein
    • , Changhai Liu
    • , Kyoko Ikeda
    • , Stanley B. Trier
    • , Roy M. Rasmussen
    • , Greg J. Holland
    •  & Martyn P. Clark
  • Research |

    Consolidated sediments in the Cascadia subduction zone may create conditions favourable for megathrust earthquake ruptures over long distances and close to the trench, according to analyses of seismic velocity of sediments from the region. Less-consolidated sediments instead may promote  aseismic slip of the plate boundary.

    • Shuoshuo Han
    • , Nathan L. Bangs
    • , Suzanne M. Carbotte
    • , Demian M. Saffer
    •  & James C. Gibson
  • Research | | open

    Earthquakes frequently occur in the brittle-ductile transition near the base of the seismogenic zone. Using shear experiments on calcite faults, here the authors show that microscale cavitation plays a role in controlling the brittle-ductile transition, and in nucleating earthquakes at the base of the seismogenic zone.

    • Berend A. Verberne
    • , Jianye Chen
    • , André R. Niemeijer
    • , Johannes H. P. de Bresser
    • , Gillian M. Pennock
    • , Martyn R. Drury
    •  & Christopher J. Spiers

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