Evolution

Definition

Evolution is the process of heritable change in populations of organisms over multiple generations. Evolutionary biology is the study of this process, which can occur through mechanisms including natural selection, sexual selection and genetic drift.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Levallois stone-tool technology found at the Guanyindong Cave site in southwest China was dated to approximately 170,000–80,000 years ago, which is much earlier than previously thought.

    • Yue Hu
    • , Ben Marwick
    • , Jia-Fu Zhang
    • , Xue Rui
    • , Ya-Mei Hou
    • , Jian-Ping Yue
    • , Wen-Rong Chen
    • , Wei-Wen Huang
    •  & Bo Li
    Nature, 1–4
  • Research | | open

    Assembly of a pan-genome from 910 humans of African descent identifies 296.5 Mb of novel DNA mapping to 125,715 distinct contigs. This African pan-genome contains ~10% more DNA than the current human reference genome.

    • Rachel M. Sherman
    • , Juliet Forman
    • , Valentin Antonescu
    • , Daniela Puiu
    • , Michelle Daya
    • , Nicholas Rafaels
    • , Meher Preethi Boorgula
    • , Sameer Chavan
    • , Candelaria Vergara
    • , Victor E. Ortega
    • , Albert M. Levin
    • , Celeste Eng
    • , Maria Yazdanbakhsh
    • , James G. Wilson
    • , Javier Marrugo
    • , Leslie A. Lange
    • , L. Keoki Williams
    • , Harold Watson
    • , Lorraine B. Ware
    • , Christopher O. Olopade
    • , Olufunmilayo Olopade
    • , Ricardo R. Oliveira
    • , Carole Ober
    • , Dan L. Nicolae
    • , Deborah A. Meyers
    • , Alvaro Mayorga
    • , Jennifer Knight-Madden
    • , Tina Hartert
    • , Nadia N. Hansel
    • , Marilyn G. Foreman
    • , Jean G. Ford
    • , Mezbah U. Faruque
    • , Georgia M. Dunston
    • , Luis Caraballo
    • , Esteban G. Burchard
    • , Eugene R. Bleecker
    • , Maria I. Araujo
    • , Edwin F. Herrera-Paz
    • , Monica Campbell
    • , Cassandra Foster
    • , Margaret A. Taub
    • , Terri H. Beaty
    • , Ingo Ruczinski
    • , Rasika A. Mathias
    • , Kathleen C. Barnes
    •  & Steven L. Salzberg
  • Research |

    Females are often dominant in spotted hyaena societies. Here, the authors show that this dominance emerges from male-biased dispersal and its effect on social bonds, which can result in increased social support for females.

    • Colin Vullioud
    • , Eve Davidian
    • , Bettina Wachter
    • , François Rousset
    • , Alexandre Courtiol
    •  & Oliver P. Höner

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