Nanoscale devices

Nanoscale devices are devices that are one hundred to ten thousand times smaller than human cells and that can manipulate matter on atomic or molecular scales. Examples of nanoscale devices are synthetic molecular motors such as rotaxanes, graphene-based transistors and nanoelectromechanical oscillators.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    A transparent stretchable (TS) capacitive sensor, which can detect pressure (force) and touch inputs distinguishably was fabricated by forming with a TS dielectric layer sandwiched between the upper piezoresistive electrode of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)–ionic liquid composite enabling to distinguish touch and pressure stimuli and the lower TS electrode of metal/indium tin oxide/metal multilayer on a transparent elastomeric substrate with stress-relieving three-dimensional microstructured pattern providing multi-directional stretchability and high pressure sensitivity. The TS sensor array demonstrated a good control of the interaction with a small vehicle as a multi-functional input device for future wearable electronics.

    • Byeong-Ung Hwang
    • , Arsalan Zabeeb
    • , Tran Quang Trung
    • , Long Wen
    • , Jae Deuk Lee
    • , Young-In Choi
    • , Han-Byeol Lee
    • , Ju Hyun Kim
    • , Jeon Geon Han
    •  & Nae-Eung Lee
  • Research | | open

    High-speed electrostatic micromotors with low energy consumption are attractive for small-scale electromechanical systems, but applications are limited by power supplies. Here the authors use a triboelectric nanogenerator for actuation of a high-speed micromotor by low-frequency mechanical stimuli.

    • Hang Yang
    • , Yaokun Pang
    • , Tianzhao Bu
    • , Wenbo Liu
    • , Jianjun Luo
    • , Dongdong Jiang
    • , Chi Zhang
    •  & Zhong Lin Wang
  • Research | | open

    Though organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with electroluminescence at sub-bandgap voltages have been reported, realizing high efficiency in such a device is difficult. Here, the authors report high efficiency sub-bandgap OLEDs featuring organic molecules with large singlet-triplet splitting.

    • Amin Salehi
    • , Chen Dong
    • , Dong-Hun Shin
    • , Liping Zhu
    • , Christopher Papa
    • , Anh Thy Bui
    • , Felix N. Castellano
    •  & Franky So
  • Research | | open

    Some atomically thin crystals feature crystallographic anisotropy, but demonstrations of electrical anisotropy are scarce. Here, the authors show that the electrical conductivity of few-layered GaTe along the x and y directions can be widely gate tuned up to 103, and demonstrate anisotropic non-volatile memory behavior.

    • Hanwen Wang
    • , Mao-Lin Chen
    • , Mengjian Zhu
    • , Yaning Wang
    • , Baojuan Dong
    • , Xingdan Sun
    • , Xiaorong Zhang
    • , Shimin Cao
    • , Xiaoxi Li
    • , Jianqi Huang
    • , Lei Zhang
    • , Weilai Liu
    • , Dongming Sun
    • , Yu Ye
    • , Kepeng Song
    • , Jianjian Wang
    • , Yu Han
    • , Teng Yang
    • , Huaihong Guo
    • , Chengbing Qin
    • , Liantuan Xiao
    • , Jing Zhang
    • , Jianhao Chen
    • , Zheng Han
    •  & Zhidong Zhang

News and Comment

  • Comments and Opinion |

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth since it can be found in every plant cell wall, cellulose has emerged as an ideal candidate for the development of renewable and biodegradable photonic materials, substituting conventional pigments.

    • Bruno Frka-Petesic
    •  & Silvia Vignolini
    Nature Photonics 13, 365-367
  • Comments and Opinion |

    Electronic and photonic devices based on graphene have unique properties, leading to outstanding performance figures of merit. Mastering the integration of this unconventional material into an established semiconductor fabrication line represents a critical step towards commercialization.

    • Daniel Neumaier
    • , Stephan Pindl
    •  & Max C. Lemme
    Nature Materials 18, 525-529
  • News and Views |

    By chemically treating wood it is possible to fabricate a nanofluidic device for generating electricity from the harvesting of ubiquitous low-grade heat.

    • Rama Venkatasubramanian
    Nature Materials 18, 536-537