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Volume 4 Issue 9, September 2009

DNA origami - the folding of long single strands of DNA into predetermined shapes using shorter 'staple strands' - can create nanostructures on which other species, such as nanoparticles, can be bound. However, DNA origami are synthesized in solution and uncontrolled deposition results in random arrangements of the nanostructures on surfaces. A team of researchers from IBM Research Almaden and the California Institute of Technology now report the placement of DNA origami shapes on lithographically patterned surfaces. From solution, DNA triangles with edges of 127 nm can bind accurately to shape-matched sites on a surface. Larger surface templates can also be used, and the atomic force microscopy image on the cover shows the triangles placed in 500-nm-wide lines patterned on a diamond-like carbon surface.

Cover design by Karen Moore

Letter p557; News & Views p543

Editorial

  • Lack of progress on nanotoxicology has been highlighted by a tragic accident in China.

    Editorial

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Commentary

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Thesis

  • Most scientists think of science as completely objective, but lab studies by social scientists — including several carried out in nanotechnology labs — suggest that it is more subjective than many scientists realize. Chris Toumey looks at the results of these studies.

    • Chris Toumey
    Thesis
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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • DNA origami tiles can bind to shape-complementary sites on lithographically patterned surfaces.

    • David W. Grainger
    News & Views
  • A new formulation of magnetic nanoparticles steered to cells by external magnets can deliver nucleic acids to turn off the growth of tumour blood vessels in mice.

    • Christian Plank
    News & Views
  • An array of quantum dots can be created inside a carbon nanotube simply by placing it on a crystalline metal substrate.

    • Joseph W. Lyding
    News & Views
  • Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is used as a quantitative method to understand the binding and exchange behaviour of proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles.

    • Iseult Lynch
    • Anna Salvati
    • Kenneth A. Dawson
    News & Views
  • The performance of photodetectors based on quantum dots may be improved by exploiting a process called multiple exciton generation.

    • Arthur J. Nozik
    News & Views
  • The electronic properties of graphene can be changed by exploiting its unusual thermal properties to introduce periodic ripples with given wavelengths and amplitudes.

    • Rodolfo Miranda
    • Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga
    News & Views
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Progress Article

  • The latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices are reviewed. The strength of the coupling between the molecules and the electrodes strongly influences the phenomena that are observed.

    • Kasper Moth-Poulsen
    • Thomas Bjørnholm
    Progress Article
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Letter

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Article

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