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The circadian clock: a framework linking metabolism, epigenetics and neuronal function

Nature Reviews Neuroscience volume 14, pages 6975 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

The circadian clock machinery is responsible for biological timekeeping on a systemic level. The central clock system controls peripheral clocks through a number of output cues that synchronize the system as a whole. There is growing evidence that changing cellular metabolic states have important effects on circadian rhythms and can thereby influence neuronal function and disease. Epigenetic control has also been implicated in the modulation of biological timekeeping, and cellular metabolism and epigenetic state seem to be closely linked. We discuss the idea that cellular metabolic state and epigenetic mechanisms might work through the circadian clock to regulate neuronal function and influence disease states.

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Acknowledgements

We thank all members of the Sassone-Corsi laboratory for helpful discussion. Funding for S.M. was provided by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) postdoctoral fellowship GM097899. Financial support for P.S.-C was provided bythe US NIH (grant AG041504), INSERM (grant 44790) and Sirtris Pharmaceuticals (SP-48984).

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  1. Selma Masri and Paolo Sassone-Corsi are at the Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA.

    • Selma Masri
    •  & Paolo Sassone-Corsi

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Paolo Sassone-Corsi.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn3393

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