Review

Cell plasticity in epithelial homeostasis and tumorigenesis

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Abstract

The adult organism is characterized by remarkable plasticity, which enables efficient regeneration and restoration of homeostasis after damage. When aberrantly activated, this plasticity contributes to tumour initiation and progression. Here we review recent advances in this field with a focus on cell fate changes and the epithelial–mesenchymal transition—two distinct, yet closely related, forms of plasticity with fundamental roles in homeostasis and cancer.

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Acknowledgements

Work in the lab of F.R.G. is supported by institutional funds from the Georg-Speyer-Haus, the LOEWE Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Frankfurt (CGT, III L 4-518/17.004), as well as grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (FOR2438; Gr1916/11-1; SFB 815; SFB 1177). The Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Georg-Speyer-Haus is funded jointly by the German Federal Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and the Arts of the State of Hessen (HMWK).

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Affiliations

  1. Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Paul-Ehrlich-Str. 42-44, 60596 Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    • Julia Varga
    •  & Florian R. Greten
  2. German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

    • Florian R. Greten

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Florian R. Greten.