Review Article | Published:

Graphene for batteries, supercapacitors and beyond

Nature Reviews Materials volume 1, Article number: 16033 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

Graphene has recently enabled the dramatic improvement of portable electronics and electric vehicles by providing better means for storing electricity. In this Review, we discuss the current status of graphene in energy storage and highlight ongoing research activities, with specific emphasis placed on the processing of graphene into electrodes, which is an essential step in the production of devices. We calculate the maximum energy density of graphene supercapacitors and outline ways for future improvements. We also discuss the synthesis and assembly of graphene into macrostructures, ranging from 0D quantum dots, 1D wires, 2D sheets and 3D frameworks, to potentially 4D self-folding materials that allow the design of batteries and supercapacitors with many new features that do not exist in current technology.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank Nanotech Energy for financial support.

Author information

Author notes

    • Maher F. El-Kady
    •  & Yuanlong Shao

    These authors contributed equally to this work

Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.

    • Maher F. El-Kady
    • , Yuanlong Shao
    •  & Richard B. Kaner
  2. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613, Egypt.

    • Maher F. El-Kady
  3. State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China.

    • Yuanlong Shao
  4. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.

    • Richard B. Kaner

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Richard B. Kaner.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/natrevmats.2016.33