Genome Watch

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  • This month's Genome Watch reviews a series of recent papers describing horizontal gene transfer from microorganisms to nematodes.

    • Magdalena Zarowiecki
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses the genome of the free-living amoeboflagellate protistNaegleria gruberi.

    • Alejandro Sanchez-Flores
    Genome Watch
  • Genome Watch describes a new technique for DNA amplification from a single cell.

    • Lia Chappell
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses the methods and implications of recent rapid sequence analyses of outbreak strains ofEscherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.

    • Thomas D. Otto
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch describes how the large size of the mimiviral genome is a result of the sympatric lifestyle of mimivirus in host amoebae.

    • Isheng J. Tsai
    Genome Watch
  • Single-cell genomics, in which individual cells are isolated from environmental samples and their genomic DNA is sequenced, is increasingly used to characterize uncultivated microorganisms.

    • Alan Walker
    Genome Watch
  • High-throughput sequencing technologies are being used to complement phenotypic screens, thereby greatly improving the power of these techniques.

    • Adam J. Reid
    Genome Watch
  • Bacterially derived enzymes that can degrade lignocellulose from plant biomass may help the production of biofuels.

    • Gemma Langridge
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch looks at how recombination has providedStreptococcus pneumoniaewith the adaptability to overcome antibiotic and immune challenges.

    • Helena Seth-Smith
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch looks at the differentBacillusspecies that can cause anthrax.

    • Susannah J. Salter
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses the application of genomic analyses to the study of difficult-to-culture sexually transmitted pathogens.

    • Alejandro Sanchez-Flores
    Genome Watch
  • Interest in the human intestinal microbiota has intensified in recent years, but research has been largely focused on bacteriology. This month's Genome Watch reviews a recent metagenomics study that instead aims to better characterize the viruses that inhabit our guts.

    • Alan Walker
    Genome Watch
  • Following on from last month's discussion of sequence assembly and correction, this month's Genome Watch examines genome annotation in the context of advances in second-generation sequencing.

    • Nicola K. Petty
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses ways to automatically produce 'base-perfect' genome sequences.

    • Thomas D. Otto
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses two related but distinct plant pathogens belonging to the oomycetes, a group of filamentous, fungus-like eukaryotes.

    • Arnab Pain
    • Christiane Hertz-Fowler
    Genome Watch
  • Recent studies on marine microorganisms and their ability to degrade oil components make for particularly poignant reading in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon rig disaster. Several groups have looked at oil-degrading bacterial communities derived from marine samples, identifying and isolating key strains, analysing transcription and investigating specific degradative enzymes.

    • Helena Seth-Smith
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses the recent production of a bacterium under the control of a synthetic genome.

    • Adam J. Reid
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses two recent examples of the use of next-generation sequencing techniques in public health settings.

    • Susannah Baldry
    Genome Watch
  • Interest in the bacteria that inhabit the human gut has increased greatly in recent years, as technological advancements have allowed new discoveries. This month's Genome Watch reviews a recent study of the microorganisms in the human gut that sets a new marker for the field of metagenomics.

    • Alan Walker
    Genome Watch
  • This month's Genome Watch discusses another fascinating example of the latest applications of second-generation sequencing techniques to the study of bacterial populations.

    • Matthew Holden
    Genome Watch