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Volume 6 Issue 6, June 2011

Devices that manipulate single electrons have applications in many areas of nanotechnology. The artist's impression on the cover shows the tip of an atomic force microscope creating a single-electron transistor at the interface between two oxide materials. Jeremy Levy and co-workers have used this approach to make a transistor in which single electrons tunnel between two nanowires through a conducting island with a diameter of just ~1.5 nm. The island (white circle at the bottom of the image), nanowires and other features are formed from a single oxide-based material that can be erased and rewritten, which is why the devices are called sketched oxide single-electron transistors.

Image credit: Guanglei Cheng.

Letter p343

Editorial

  • The detailed characterization of the materials is essential in all areas of nanotoxicology.

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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • The observation of nonlinear damping in resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene should lead to an improved understanding of energy losses in nanomechanical devices.

    • J. Scott Bunch
    News & Views
  • Experiments on the uptake of gold nanoparticles by cells grown in different cell culture configurations suggest that the influence of sedimentation should be taken into account when performing in vitro studies.

    • Dominique Lison
    • François Huaux
    News & Views
  • Layered films of two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks with accessible and aligned pores can be created on graphene surfaces using a solvothermal condensation reaction.

    • Mirjam Dogru
    • Thomas Bein
    News & Views
  • A lens that randomly scatters light can beat the resolution of a conventional lens by at least a factor of two.

    • Wolfgang S. Bacsa
    News & Views
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