Collections

  • Collection |

    See what scientists world-wide have been citing and sharing. In this Web Focus we highlight a selection of articles from 2018 which top the list of the journal’s most cited and most shared (including press coverage, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and Weibo). They showcase the breadth of scope and coverage that the journal consistently delivers to its readers.

    Image: enot-poloskun
  • Focus |

    In celebration of International Women's Day this year, we have put together a collection of papers by some prominent female geneticists who have published in Heredity. In each case, we are highlighting their oldest lead author publication in the journal, as well as their most recent contribution, excluding conference abstracts.

  • Focus |

    In this Web Focus we highlight a selection of articles from 2016 and 2017 which top the list of the journal’s most cited and most shared (including press coverage, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and Weibo). They showcase the breadth of scope and coverage that the journal consistently delivers to its readers.

    Image: enot-poloskun
  • Special |

    The Population Genetic Group meetings have been a key forum in the last half century for discussion of the maintenance and distribution of genetic variation in natural populations, the genetic basis and evolution of quantitative traits, mechanisms of adaptation, sexual selection and speciation, and much more. The small selection of papers in this Special Issue illustrates the diversity and vibrancy of the 'PopGroup' community and helps to mark this anniversary.

    Image: enot-poloskun
  • Special |

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies, statistics and theory have advanced the field of population genetics. This special issue deals with the effective population size (Ne), an important parameter to predict evolutionary trajectories and to plan conservation actions. The effective size of populations can be estimated from genetic or from life history data and depends on a variety of parameters, such as the neighborhood of a population, or its mode of reproduction. Estimation methods have benefited from genome-wide genotyping and new estimation methods may be more precise and balanced. The contributions of this special issue provide improved ways to predict and estimate the effective population size in different situations and present applied studies where Ne was estimated in different natural settings. As such the special issue may serve as a resource and guideline, or as inspiration to population geneticists, researchers interested in microevolution and conservationists.

    Image: enot-poloskun
  • Special |

    Due to their extensive gene flow, long lifespans and flexible mating systems, many forest trees are resilient to most of the population genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation, but may still exhibit increased inbreeding and correlated paternity. Here we present five studies that advance our understanding of forest fragmentation genetics and make it clear that: (a) in impacted landscapes, it is the diversity and fitness of progeny that matters; (b) mating system, breeding system and landscape context determine sensitivity to fragmentation. A focus on these research areas will help deliver better management outcomes for trees in impacted landscapes.

    Image: enot-poloskun