Review Article | Published:

Endocrine disruptors and obesity

Nature Reviews Endocrinology volume 11, pages 653661 (2015) | Download Citation

Abstract

The increasing incidence of obesity is a serious global public health challenge. Although the obesity epidemic is largely fueled by poor nutrition and lack of exercise, certain chemicals have been shown to potentially have a role in its aetiology. A substantial body of evidence suggests that a subclass of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which interfere with endocrine signalling, can disrupt hormonally regulated metabolic processes, especially if exposure occurs during early development. These chemicals, so-called 'obesogens' might predispose some individuals to gain weight despite their efforts to limit caloric intake and increase levels of physical activity. This Review discusses the role of EDCs in the obesity epidemic, the latest research on the obesogen concept, epidemiological and experimental findings on obesogens, and their modes of action. The research reviewed here provides knowledge that health scientists can use to inform their research and decision-making processes.

Key points

  • Obesity is an increasing global public health problem

  • Obesity is a disease of the endocrine system, which involves many tissues and metabolic processes

  • The rapid growth of the obesity epidemic over the past few decades suggests that environmental factors might have a role in the aetiology of the disease

  • Obesity probably has its origins during development, when susceptibility to weight gain and alterations in metabolism develop

  • Obesogens are a subclass of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that might predispose individuals to the development of obesity

  • The obesogen hypothesis provides a means for the prevention of obesity by reducing exposure to EDCs during early development

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Affiliations

  1. Division of Extramural Research and Training, Population Health Branch, National Institute of Environmental Sciences, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

    • Jerrold J. Heindel
    •  & Thaddeus T. Schug
  2. Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institutes of Health, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

    • Retha Newbold

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J.J.H., R.N. and T.T.S. researched data for the article, provided substantial contributions to discussions of content, wrote the article and reviewed and/or edited the manuscript before submission.

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Jerrold J. Heindel.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2015.163

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