Letter | Published:

X-linked IAP is a direct inhibitor of cell-death proteases

Nature volume 388, pages 300304 (17 July 1997) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The inhibitor-of-apoptosis (IAP) family of genes has an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating programmed cell death in animals ranging from insects to humans1,2,3,4,5,6. Ectopic expression of human IAP proteins can suppress cell death induced by a variety of stimuli, but the mechanism of this inhibition was previously unknown. Here we show that human X-chromosome-linked IAP directly inhibits at least two members of the caspase family of cell-death proteases, caspase-3 and caspase-7. As the caspases are highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom and are the principal effectors of apoptosis7, our findings suggest how IAPs might inhibit cell death, providing evidence for a mechanism of action for these mammalian cell-death suppressors.

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Author information

Author notes

    • Quinn L. Deveraux
    •  & Ryosuke Takahashi

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. The Burnham Institute, Program on Apoptosis and Cell Death Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California92037, USA

    • Guy S. Salvesen
    •  & John C. Reed

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Correspondence to John C. Reed.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/40901

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