Catalysis

Catalysis is the increase in the rate of a chemical reaction by the addition of a reagent — the catalyst — that is not itself consumed. The catalyst works by opening up a route between starting material and product with a lower activation barrier than the uncatalyzed process.

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News and Comment

  • News and Views |

    Controlled Pt loading on TiO2 nanoparticles enables single-site catalysts. With this, the coordination environment and catalytic activity can be obtained, allowing extraction of structure-function information.

    • E. Charles H. Sykes
    Nature Materials 18, 663-664
  • News and Views |

    Understanding the nature of active sites in carbon electrocatalysis remains a subject of dispute and a great scientific challenge. Convincing new evidence supports the fact that, for oxygen reduction, defects present in carbon materials are more powerful catalytic sites than nitrogenated sites.

    • Magdalena Titirici
  • Comments and Opinion |

    Radical intermediates are key species in many chemical transformations. Recent advances have provided a new suite of selective radical alkylation reactions. This Comment highlights pioneering studies using alkyl amines that act as radical precursors in a number of catalytic processes by their conversion to alkylpyridinium salts.

    • Duanyang Kong
    • , Patrick J. Moon
    •  & Rylan J. Lundgren
    Nature Catalysis 2, 473-476
  • News and Views |

    A synthetic DNA enzyme catalyses the formation of a native phosphodiester bond between two RNA fragments, but the molecular details of the mechanism remained elusive. Research using computational and biochemical approaches now suggests that the DNA enzyme recruits two magnesium ions to assist in the catalysis of RNA ligation.

    • Claudia Höbartner
    Nature Catalysis 2, 483-484