Genetic hybridization

  • Article
    | Open Access

    Chinese chestnut is widely cultivated for nut production and harbors value as a genetic resource for restoration of American and European chestnut trees destroyed by chestnut blight. Here, the authors reveal the genomic basis of homoploid hybrid speciation within Castanea spp. and find the nonrandom distribution of reproductive barrier loci based on a high-quality reference genome.

    • Yongshuai Sun
    • , Zhiqiang Lu
    •  & Hui Ma
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Many industrial organisms are the result of recent or ancient allopolypoidy events. Here the authors iteratively combine the genomes of six yeast species to generate a viable hybrid.

    • David Peris
    • , William G. Alexander
    •  & Chris Todd Hittinger
  • Article
    | Open Access

    In the Indo-Pacific, multiple Anguilla eel species overlap in their spawning. Here, the authors sequence three Anguilla genomes and with genome-wide data of four more congeners, investigate contemporary hybridization, historical introgression, and the maintenance of species boundaries despite substantial gene flow.

    • Julia M. I. Barth
    • , Chrysoula Gubili
    •  & Robert Schabetsberger
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Ecological speciation can proceed rapidly, but the origin of genetic variation facilitating it has remained elusive. Here, the authors show that secondary contact and introgression between deeply diverged lineages of stickleback fish facilitated rapid ecological speciation into lake and stream ecotypes in Lake Constance.

    • David A. Marques
    • , Kay Lucek
    •  & Ole Seehausen
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Hybridization across species can lead to offspring with reduced fertility. Here, the authors experimentally evolve yeast and show that whole-genome duplication during asexual reproduction can restore fertility in hybrids over a relatively short evolutionary timespan.

    • Guillaume Charron
    • , Souhir Marsit
    •  & Christian R. Landry
  • Article
    | Open Access

    During meiotic recombination, genetic information is transferred or exchanged between parental chromosome copies. Using a large hybrid mouse pedigree, the authors generated high-resolution maps of these transfer/exchange events and discovered new properties governing their processing and resolution.

    • Ran Li
    • , Emmanuelle Bitoun
    •  & Simon R. Myers
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Developing hybrid rice cultivars requires time consuming random crossing. Here, the authors develop a new next generation sequencing-based quantitative trait locus mapping method to dissect heterotic gene OsMADS1 and demonstrate the feasibility of pyramiding two genes to achieve large heterotic effect.

    • Changsheng Wang
    • , Shican Tang
    •  & Bin Han
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The pygmy hog (Porcula salvania), now highly endangered and restricted in a small region at the southern foothills of the Himalaya, is the only suid species in mainland Eurasia that outlived the expansion of wild boar (Sus scrofa). Here, the authors analyze genomes of pygmy hog and related suid species, and identify signals of introgression among these species.

    • Langqing Liu
    • , Mirte Bosse
    •  & Ole Madsen
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Hybridization can contribute to diversity from the genomic to the species level. Here, Eberlein, Hénault et al. investigate genomic, transcriptomic and phenotypic variation among wild lineages of the yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus and suggest that an incipient species has formed by recurrent hybridization.

    • Chris Eberlein
    • , Mathieu Hénault
    •  & Christian R. Landry
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Stocking of hatchery produced fish is widely used to supplement wild fish populations. Here, the authors show that supplementary stocking can unintentionally favour introgressed individuals with domestic genotypes and compromise the fitness of a wild population of Atlantic salmon.

    • Ingerid J. Hagen
    • , Arne J. Jensen
    •  & Sten Karlsson
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Turnovers in sex determination systems occur quite frequently, yet the evolutionary drivers of these turnovers are not well understood. Here, the authors study the sex determination systems in sticklebacks and propose chromosomal inversions as a possible driver of the evolution of sex determination.

    • Heini M. Natri
    • , Juha Merilä
    •  & Takahito Shikano
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Feralisation or the reintroduction of domestic animals into the wild population requires adaptation to survive. Here, the authors analyse the genetics of domestic chickens released into the wild and identify genomic regions that are selected for during feralisation.

    • M. Johnsson
    • , E. Gering
    •  & D. Wright