Gastroenterology

  • Article
    | Open Access

    Alternative RNA splicing is important during organismal development. Here, the authors perform RNA-Seq on mouse and human liver samples to provide a comprehensive view of splicing events during liver development and growth, and identify Espr2 as a main regulator of these splicing processes.

    • Amruta Bhate
    • , Darren J. Parker
    •  & Auinash Kalsotra
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Commensal microbes are necessary for proper development of the immune system. Here Zanvit et al. show that neonatal antibiotics treatment causes long-term changes in the gut and skin microbiomes, and exacerbates immune-mediated skin pathology at adult age in mouse experimental models of psoriasis.

    • Peter Zanvit
    • , Joanne E. Konkel
    •  & WanJun Chen
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The inner layer of the mucus that covers our intestine is nearly sterile. Here, the authors show in mice that the outer mucus layer constitutes a unique microbial niche hosting bacterial communities with distinct proliferation rates and resource utilization activities.

    • Hai Li
    • , Julien P. Limenitakis
    •  & Andrew J. Macpherson
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The potential recovery of the human gut microbiota after an antibiotic treatment, and its effects on our health, are poorly understood. Here, the authors use a mouse model mimicking paediatric antibiotic use to shed new light into these processes.

    • Yael R. Nobel
    • , Laura M. Cox
    •  & Martin J. Blaser
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The human gut microbiota helps us to degrade complex dietary carbohydrates such as xylan and, in turn, the carbohydrate breakdown products control the structure of the microbiota. Here the authors characterize the xylan-degrading apparatus of a key member of the gut microbiota, Bacteroides ovatus.

    • Artur Rogowski
    • , Jonathon A. Briggs
    •  & David N. Bolam
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Bile acids are important for the absorption of nutrients. Here the authors provide a molecular explanation for the oscillatory release of bile acids, showing that diurnal expression of the transcription factor KLF15 regulates FGF15 secretion from enterocytes, which then inhibits bile acid synthesis in the liver.

    • Shuxin Han
    • , Rongli Zhang
    •  & Mukesh K. Jain
  • Article |

    NADPH acts as a reducing currency in mammalian cells and is thought to be required to maintain redox homeostasis. Here the authors discover an alternative NADPH-independent pathway, based on the conversion of methionine into cysteine, which is capable of sustaining redox homeostasis in the mouse liver.

    • Sofi Eriksson
    • , Justin R. Prigge
    •  & Edward E. Schmidt
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The adult gastro-intestinal tract harbours stem cells that differ in their differentiation programme and in the gene repertoire that they express. Here the authors show that single adult Lgr5-positive stem cells require Cdx2 to maintain their intestinal identity and are converted into pyloric stem cells in the absence of this transcription factor.

    • Salvatore Simmini
    • , Monika Bialecka
    •  & Jacqueline Deschamps
  • Article |

    Metabolites produced by the gut microbiota can potentially affect our physiology. Here, the authors present a metabolomics strategy that models microbiota metabolism as a reaction network and uses pathway analysis to facilitate identification and characterization of microbial metabolites.

    • Gautham V. Sridharan
    • , Kyungoh Choi
    •  & Arul Jayaraman