Peter Boone, Lauren Rochelle et al.

A rainbow mouse model for visualizing clonal expansion of oncogenes in the intestine

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Physical sciences

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  • Perspective
    | Open Access

    The role microbes play in human health and the ability of synthetic biology to engineer microbial properties opens up new ways of treating disease. In this perspective, the authors describe the design and development of these living therapeutics.

    • Mark R. Charbonneau
    • , Vincent M. Isabella
    • , Ning Li
    •  & Caroline B. Kurtz
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Current synthetic DNA-based data storage systems have high recording costs, read-write latency and error-rates that make them uncompetitive compared to traditional digital storage. The authors use nicks in native DNA to encode data in parallel and create access sites for in-memory computations.

    • S. Kasra Tabatabaei
    • , Boya Wang
    • , Nagendra Bala Murali Athreya
    • , Behnam Enghiad
    • , Alvaro Gonzalo Hernandez
    • , Christopher J. Fields
    • , Jean-Pierre Leburton
    • , David Soloveichik
    • , Huimin Zhao
    •  & Olgica Milenkovic
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The supply of oxygen species for dynamic therapy is a major limitation. Here, the authors report on a complex of calcium peroxide with photo/chemo dynamic agents, where NIR heating causes the release of calcium peroxide to generate oxygen and hydrogen peroxide for photodynamic and chemodynamic therapy.

    • Conghui Liu
    • , Yu Cao
    • , Yaru Cheng
    • , Dongdong Wang
    • , Tailin Xu
    • , Lei Su
    • , Xueji Zhang
    •  & Haifeng Dong

Earth and environmental sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    Many major mass extinction events have been associated with large volcanic eruption events, with the argument that large volumes of volcanic degassing could trigger past global climate changes. Here, the authors find that during the end-Triassic extinction event volcanic pulses emitted large amounts of CO2 comparable to projected anthropogenic emissions for the 21st century in the future 2 °C warming scenario.

    • Manfredo Capriolo
    • , Andrea Marzoli
    • , László E. Aradi
    • , Sara Callegaro
    • , Jacopo Dal Corso
    • , Robert J. Newton
    • , Benjamin J. W. Mills
    • , Paul B. Wignall
    • , Omar Bartoli
    • , Don R. Baker
    • , Nasrrddine Youbi
    • , Laurent Remusat
    • , Richard Spiess
    •  & Csaba Szabó
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The North Atlantic current has been suspected to trigger intrusions of temperate marine species in the Arctic. Here, Oziel and colleagues reveal the link between the poleward intrusion of the temperate coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and the North Atlantic current, showing evidence for bio-advection as an important mechanism.

    • L. Oziel
    • , A. Baudena
    • , M. Ardyna
    • , P. Massicotte
    • , A. Randelhoff
    • , J.-B. Sallée
    • , R. B. Ingvaldsen
    • , E. Devred
    •  & M. Babin
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Earth’s surface underwent a dramatic transition ~2.3 billion years ago when atmospheric oxygen first accumulated during the Great Oxidation Event. Here, the authors find that biogenic methane and volcanic emissions played a vital role in the reduced Late Archean atmosphere.

    • Aubrey L. Zerkle
    • , Runsheng Yin
    • , Chaoyue Chen
    • , Xiangdong Li
    • , Gareth J. Izon
    •  & Stephen E. Grasby

Biological sciences

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  • Perspective
    | Open Access

    The role microbes play in human health and the ability of synthetic biology to engineer microbial properties opens up new ways of treating disease. In this perspective, the authors describe the design and development of these living therapeutics.

    • Mark R. Charbonneau
    • , Vincent M. Isabella
    • , Ning Li
    •  & Caroline B. Kurtz
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Current synthetic DNA-based data storage systems have high recording costs, read-write latency and error-rates that make them uncompetitive compared to traditional digital storage. The authors use nicks in native DNA to encode data in parallel and create access sites for in-memory computations.

    • S. Kasra Tabatabaei
    • , Boya Wang
    • , Nagendra Bala Murali Athreya
    • , Behnam Enghiad
    • , Alvaro Gonzalo Hernandez
    • , Christopher J. Fields
    • , Jean-Pierre Leburton
    • , David Soloveichik
    • , Huimin Zhao
    •  & Olgica Milenkovic
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Recent evidence has questioned the dogma of strict maternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in humans. Wei et al. saw no evidence of paternal transmission of mtDNA in 11,035 human trios, and show that nuclear-mitochondrial segments (NUMTs) can give the impression of paternal mtDNA transmission, but are actually inherited through the nuclear genome.

    • Wei Wei
    • , Alistair T. Pagnamenta
    • , Nicholas Gleadall
    • , Alba Sanchis-Juan
    • , Jonathan Stephens
    • , John Broxholme
    • , Salih Tuna
    • , Christopher A. Odhams
    • , J. C. Ambrose
    • , E. L. Baple
    • , M. Bleda
    • , F. Boardman-Pretty
    • , J. M. Boissiere
    • , C. R. Boustred
    • , M. J. Caulfield
    • , G. C. Chan
    • , C. E. H. Craig
    • , L. C. Daugherty
    • , A. de Burca
    • , A. Devereau
    • , G. Elgar
    • , R. E. Foulger
    • , T. Fowler
    • , P. Furió-Tarí
    • , J. M. Hackett
    • , D. Halai
    • , J. E. Holman
    • , T. J. P. Hubbard
    • , R. Jackson
    • , D. Kasperaviciute
    • , M. Kayikci
    • , L. Lahnstein
    • , K. Lawson
    • , S. E. A. Leigh
    • , I. U. S. Leong
    • , F. J. Lopez
    • , F. Maleady-Crowe
    • , J. Mason
    • , E. M. McDonagh
    • , L. Moutsianas
    • , M. Mueller
    • , N. Murugaesu
    • , A. C. Need
    • , C. A. Odhams
    • , C. Patch
    • , D. Perez-Gil
    • , D. Polychronopoulos
    • , J. Pullinger
    • , T. Rahim
    • , A. Rendon
    • , P. Riesgo-Ferreiro
    • , T. Rogers
    • , M. Ryten
    • , K. Savage
    • , K. Sawant
    • , R. H. Scott
    • , A. Siddiq
    • , A. Sieghart
    • , D. Smedley
    • , K. R. Smith
    • , A. Sosinsky
    • , W. Spooner
    • , H. E. Stevens
    • , A. Stuckey
    • , R. Sultana
    • , E. R. A. Thomas
    • , S. R. Thompson
    • , C. Tregidgo
    • , A. Tucci
    • , E. Walsh
    • , S. A. Watters
    • , M. J. Welland
    • , E. Williams
    • , K. Witkowska
    • , S. M. Wood
    • , M. Zarowiecki
    • , Alba Sanchis-Juan
    • , Jonathan Stephens
    • , Salih Tuna
    • , Ernest Turro
    • , Patrick F. Chinnery
    • , Carl Fratter
    • , Ernest Turro
    • , Mark J. Caulfield
    • , Jenny C. Taylor
    • , Shamima Rahman
    •  & Patrick F. Chinnery

Health sciences

See All
  • Perspective
    | Open Access

    The role microbes play in human health and the ability of synthetic biology to engineer microbial properties opens up new ways of treating disease. In this perspective, the authors describe the design and development of these living therapeutics.

    • Mark R. Charbonneau
    • , Vincent M. Isabella
    • , Ning Li
    •  & Caroline B. Kurtz
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits multigenerational adaptation to bacterial infection but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, the authors show that C. elegans parental exposure to Pseudomonas vranovensis promotes offspring resistance to infection, a process mediated by the cysteine synthases CYSL-1 and CYSL-2.

    • Nicholas O. Burton
    • , Cristian Riccio
    • , Alexandra Dallaire
    • , Jonathan Price
    • , Benjamin Jenkins
    • , Albert Koulman
    •  & Eric A. Miska
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The supply of oxygen species for dynamic therapy is a major limitation. Here, the authors report on a complex of calcium peroxide with photo/chemo dynamic agents, where NIR heating causes the release of calcium peroxide to generate oxygen and hydrogen peroxide for photodynamic and chemodynamic therapy.

    • Conghui Liu
    • , Yu Cao
    • , Yaru Cheng
    • , Dongdong Wang
    • , Tailin Xu
    • , Lei Su
    • , Xueji Zhang
    •  & Haifeng Dong

News & Comment

  • Comment
    | Open Access

    Asteroids, comets and moons are leftovers of planet formation. Studying them and their samples, including meteorites, can help us to learn how the Earth was made and acquired the ingredients for life, to obtain practical information for deflecting near-Earth objects (NEOs), and to access resources that would enable space habitats and voyages. Answers are hidden beneath their complex and evolving exteriors.

    • Erik Asphaug
  • Comment
    | Open Access

    Observations from the Juno and Cassini missions provide essential constraints on the internal structures and compositions of Jupiter and Saturn, resulting in profound revisions of our understanding of the interior and atmospheres of Gas Giant planets. The next step to understand planetary origins in our Solar System requires a mission to their Ice Giant siblings, Uranus and Neptune.

    • Tristan Guillot
    •  & Leigh N. Fletcher
  • Comment
    | Open Access

    Jupiter’s satellite Europa almost certainly hides a global saltwater ocean beneath its icy surface. Chemistry at the ice surface and ocean-rock interface might provide the building blocks for life, and NASA’s Europa Clipper mission will assess Europa’s habitability.

    • Samuel M. Howell
    •  & Robert T. Pappalardo
  • Comment
    | Open Access

    How does chemistry scale in complexity to unerringly direct biological functions? Nass Kovacs et al. have shown that bacteriorhodopsin undergoes structural changes tantalizingly similar to the expected pathway even under excessive excitation. Is the protein structure so highly evolved that it directs all deposited energy into the designed function?

    • R. J. Dwayne Miller
    • , Olivier Paré-Labrosse
    • , Antoine Sarracini
    •  & Jessica E. Besaw
  • Comment
    | Open Access

    Utilising identical genetic aberrations but targeting different cells, Zhang and colleagues seek to uncover how the cell of origin influences high-grade serous ovarian cancer biology, metastasis and response to treatment.

    • Emily K. Colvin
    •  & Viive M. Howell

Focus

Energy Materials

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Energy Materials

Editors' Highlights: Each month our editors select a small number of Articles recently published in Nature Communications that they believe are particularly interesting or important.

Prateek Dongare, Benjamin Martindale, Adam Weingarten and Yaoqing Zhang

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