Volume 496 Issue 7444, 11 April 2013

Fossil dinosaur embryos are extremely rare, and mainly restricted to the Late Cretaceous period. Hence the interest in a newly uncovered bone bed of Lower Jurassic sauropodomorph embryos from China, which at about 190 - 197 million years old is the oldest assemblage of such bones ever found. A three-year multinational programme of excavation and research has yielded a treasure trove of embryonic bones, and the oldest known evidence of organic remains. Study of bones preserved at various developmental stages indicates that these large dinosaurs had a short incubation time and flexed their muscles while still in the egg, preparing the growing skeleton for life in the outside world. On the cover, a coloured thin section of an embryonic femur showing its internal tissues and large marrow cavity.

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    Controversy over the results touted by a genetic-ancestry firm has highlighted the need for reform of the United Kingdom’s restrictive libel law.

  • Editorial |

    Everyone should wish Germany well in its great experiment in renewable energy.

  • Editorial |

    A court ruling to remove age limits on access to emergency contraception must prevail.

World View

Research Highlights

Seven Days

  • Seven Days |

    The week in science: Investigation launched into muzzled Canadian scientists; Marcia McNutt takes the helm at Science; and the origins of antimatter are probed.

News

Correction

News Feature

  • News Feature |

    A mutation that gives people rock-bottom cholesterol levels has led geneticists to what could be the next blockbuster heart drug.

    • Stephen S. Hall

Comment

  • Comment |

    Kristoffer Famm and colleagues unveil a multidisciplinary initiative to develop medicines that use electrical impulses to modulate the body's neural circuits.

    • Kristoffer Famm
    • , Brian Litt
    • , Kevin J. Tracey
    • , Edward S. Boyden
    •  & Moncef Slaoui
  • Comment |

    Sidekick status does Alfred Russel Wallace an injustice. He was a visionary scientist in his own right, a daring explorer and a passionate socialist, argues Andrew Berry.

    • Andrew Berry

Books & Arts

  • Books & Arts |

    David Quammen re-enters the 'Milky Way of land masses' evoked by Alfred Russel Wallace's masterpiece of biogeography.

    • David Quammen
  • Books & Arts |

    Genevieve Dion works at textile engineering's cutting edge at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Ahead of the Smart Fabrics conference in San Francisco, California, she talks about knitting robots, permanently pleating silk and charging mobile phones from shirts.

    • Jascha Hoffman

Correspondence

News & Views

  • News & Views |

    The philosopher Albert Camus once said, “Life is the sum of all your choices”. Work using an innovative experimental design in humans and rats shows that many of the errors in those choices come from the senses, not from cognition.

    • Matthew T. Kaufman
    •  & Anne K. Churchland
  • News & Views |

    Using a hexagonal array of helical waveguides, physicists have observed robust optical waves that move in one direction, bypassing obstacles and imperfections exactly as predicted by the theory of topological insulators. See Letter p.196

    • Yidong Chong
  • News & Views |

    Anxiety does not arise from a single neural circuit. An interplay between neighbouring, yet opposing, circuits produces anxiety, and outputs from these circuits regulate specific anxiety responses. See Letters p.219 & p.224

    • Joshua P. Johansen
  • News & Views |

    Genome sequencing of cells plucked from marine sediments reveals metabolic details for two abundant lineages of Archaea. These microorganisms may play a key part in breaking down protein buried deep inside Earth. See Letter p.215

    • David L. Valentine
  • News & Views |

    Telomerase synthesizes DNA sequences that protect the integrity of chromosome ends. A model for how the components of this enzyme complex co-assemble offers insight into its structure and function. See Article p.187

    • Benjamin M. Akiyama
    •  & Michael D. Stone
  • News & Views |

    Saturn's atmosphere bears a latent image of its icy rings, implying that electrically charged bits of water ice are being transported along magnetic-field lines of force from sources in the ring plane to the upper atmosphere. See Letter p.193

    • Jack Connerney

Article

  • Article |

    The long-awaited structure of a telomerase holoenzyme, from Tetrahymena, has been obtained by electron microscopy; affinity labelling of subunits and modelling with NMR and crystal structures of various components allowed the identification of the catalytic core and subunit interactions, and the functional role of the subunits in telomerase processivity was enabled by performing the first reconstitution of the holoenzyme in vitro.

    • Jiansen Jiang
    • , Edward J. Miracco
    • , Kyungah Hong
    • , Barbara Eckert
    • , Henry Chan
    • , Darian D. Cash
    • , Bosun Min
    • , Z. Hong Zhou
    • , Kathleen Collins
    •  & Juli Feigon

Letter

  • Letter |

    A pattern of features is detected, superposed on Saturn’s low-latitude infrared glow, that implies the transfer of charged species derived from water (ring ‘rain’) from the ring plane to the ionosphere, ultimately leading to the global modulation of upper atmospheric chemistry.

    • J. O’Donoghue
    • , T. S. Stallard
    • , H. Melin
    • , G. H. Jones
    • , S. W. H. Cowley
    • , S. Miller
    • , K. H. Baines
    •  & J. S. D. Blake
  • Letter |

    An experimental realization of a photonic topological insulator is reported that consists of helical waveguides arranged in a honeycomb lattice; the helicity provides a symmetry-breaking effect, leading to optical states that are topologically protected against scattering by disorder.

    • Mikael C. Rechtsman
    • , Julia M. Zeuner
    • , Yonatan Plotnik
    • , Yaakov Lumer
    • , Daniel Podolsky
    • , Felix Dreisow
    • , Stefan Nolte
    • , Mordechai Segev
    •  & Alexander Szameit
  • Letter |

    Topographic analyses and numerical modelling of canyon formation across the Hawaiian island of Kaua‘i show that rivers erode into bedrock more efficiently where precipitation rates are higher.

    • Ken L. Ferrier
    • , Kimberly L. Huppert
    •  & J. Taylor Perron
  • Letter |

    Analysis of an Early Jurassic dinosaur bone bed reveals the rapid early growth stages of sauropodomorph embryos as well as the earliest evidence of in situ organic remains from a terrestrial vertebrate.

    • Robert R. Reisz
    • , Timothy D. Huang
    • , Eric M. Roberts
    • , ShinRung Peng
    • , Corwin Sullivan
    • , Koen Stein
    • , Aaron R. H. LeBlanc
    • , DarBin Shieh
    • , RongSeng Chang
    • , ChengCheng Chiang
    • , Chuanwei Yang
    •  & Shiming Zhong
  • Letter |

    Miscellaneous crenarchaeotal group (MCG) and marine benthic group-D (MBG-D) are among the most numerous archaea in sea-floor sediments; single-cell genomics reveals that these archaea belong to new branches of the archaeal tree and probably have a role in protein remineralization in anoxic marine sediments.

    • Karen G. Lloyd
    • , Lars Schreiber
    • , Dorthe G. Petersen
    • , Kasper U. Kjeldsen
    • , Mark A. Lever
    • , Andrew D. Steen
    • , Ramunas Stepanauskas
    • , Michael Richter
    • , Sara Kleindienst
    • , Sabine Lenk
    • , Andreas Schramm
    •  & Bo Barker Jørgensen
  • Letter |

    Different subregions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis are shown to increase and decrease anxiety in mice, and distinct neural projections arising from a single coordinating brain region modulate different anxiety features.

    • Sung-Yon Kim
    • , Avishek Adhikari
    • , Soo Yeun Lee
    • , James H. Marshel
    • , Christina K. Kim
    • , Caitlin S. Mallory
    • , Maisie Lo
    • , Sally Pak
    • , Joanna Mattis
    • , Byung Kook Lim
    • , Robert C. Malenka
    • , Melissa R. Warden
    • , Rachael Neve
    • , Kay M. Tye
    •  & Karl Deisseroth
  • Letter |

    Examination of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis projections to the ventral tegmental area shows that glutamatergic and GABAergic projections have opposing effects on reward and anxiety.

    • Joshua H. Jennings
    • , Dennis R. Sparta
    • , Alice M. Stamatakis
    • , Randall L. Ung
    • , Kristen E. Pleil
    • , Thomas L. Kash
    •  & Garret D. Stuber
  • Letter |

    In vivo ‘cellular barcoding’ shows that early haematopoietic progenitors are heterogeneous in the cell types that they produce, and this is partly due to an ‘imprinting’ of fate in progenitors, including for a separate dendritic cell lineage.

    • Shalin H. Naik
    • , Leïla Perié
    • , Erwin Swart
    • , Carmen Gerlach
    • , Nienke van Rooij
    • , Rob J. de Boer
    •  & Ton N. Schumacher
  • Letter |

    Salmonella effector proteins trigger host innate immunity through the activation of small Rho GTPases, which, in turn, is sensed by the NOD1/2 signalling pathway.

    • A. Marijke Keestra
    • , Maria G. Winter
    • , Josef J. Auburger
    • , Simon P. Fräßle
    • , Mariana N. Xavier
    • , Sebastian E. Winter
    • , Anita Kim
    • , Victor Poon
    • , Mariëtta M. Ravesloot
    • , Julian F. T. Waldenmaier
    • , Renée M. Tsolis
    • , Richard A. Eigenheer
    •  & Andreas J. Bäumler
  • Letter |

    Succinate is identified as a metabolite in innate immune signalling, which leads to enhanced interleukin-1β production during inflammation.

    • G. M. Tannahill
    • , A. M. Curtis
    • , J. Adamik
    • , E. M. Palsson-McDermott
    • , A. F. McGettrick
    • , G. Goel
    • , C. Frezza
    • , N. J. Bernard
    • , B. Kelly
    • , N. H. Foley
    • , L. Zheng
    • , A. Gardet
    • , Z. Tong
    • , S. S. Jany
    • , S. C. Corr
    • , M. Haneklaus
    • , B. E. Caffrey
    • , K. Pierce
    • , S. Walmsley
    • , F. C. Beasley
    • , E. Cummins
    • , V. Nizet
    • , M. Whyte
    • , C. T. Taylor
    • , H. Lin
    • , S. L. Masters
    • , E. Gottlieb
    • , V. P. Kelly
    • , C. Clish
    • , P. E. Auron
    • , R. J. Xavier
    •  & L. A. J. O’Neill
  • Letter |

    Several X-ray crystal structures of an H+-driven multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter from Pyrococcus furiosus are presented, whose complex structure with macrocyclic peptides may help facilitate the discovery of efficient inhibitors of MATE transporters.

    • Yoshiki Tanaka
    • , Christopher J. Hipolito
    • , Andrés D. Maturana
    • , Koichi Ito
    • , Teruo Kuroda
    • , Takashi Higuchi
    • , Takayuki Katoh
    • , Hideaki E. Kato
    • , Motoyuki Hattori
    • , Kaoru Kumazaki
    • , Tomoya Tsukazaki
    • , Ryuichiro Ishitani
    • , Hiroaki Suga
    •  & Osamu Nureki

Corrigendum

Erratum

  • Erratum |

    • Thomas Barclay
    • , Jason F. Rowe
    • , Jack J. Lissauer
    • , Daniel Huber
    • , François Fressin
    • , Steve B. Howell
    • , Stephen T. Bryson
    • , William J. Chaplin
    • , Jean-Michel Désert
    • , Eric D. Lopez
    • , Geoffrey W. Marcy
    • , Fergal Mullally
    • , Darin Ragozzine
    • , Guillermo Torres
    • , Elisabeth R. Adams
    • , Eric Agol
    • , David Barrado
    • , Sarbani Basu
    • , Timothy R. Bedding
    • , Lars A. Buchhave
    • , David Charbonneau
    • , Jessie L. Christiansen
    • , Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard
    • , David Ciardi
    • , William D. Cochran
    • , Andrea K. Dupree
    • , Yvonne Elsworth
    • , Mark Everett
    • , Debra A. Fischer
    • , Eric B. Ford
    • , Jonathan J. Fortney
    • , John C. Geary
    • , Michael R. Haas
    • , Rasmus Handberg
    • , Saskia Hekker
    • , Christopher E. Henze
    • , Elliott Horch
    • , Andrew W. Howard
    • , Roger C. Hunter
    • , Howard Isaacson
    • , Jon M. Jenkins
    • , Christoffer Karoff
    • , Steven D. Kawaler
    • , Hans Kjeldsen
    • , Todd C. Klaus
    • , David W. Latham
    • , Jie Li
    • , Jorge Lillo-Box
    • , Mikkel N. Lund
    • , Mia Lundkvist
    • , Travis S. Metcalfe
    • , Andrea Miglio
    • , Robert L. Morris
    • , Elisa V. Quintana
    • , Dennis Stello
    • , Jeffrey C. Smith
    • , Martin Still
    •  & Susan E. Thompson

Technology Feature

  • Technology Feature |

    Advances in cell culture media mean that scientists increasingly know what has gone into the mix, and cells are enjoying a more natural environment — even in the lab.

    • Vivien Marx

Feature

  • Feature |

    Involving members of the public can help science projects — but researchers should consider what they want to achieve.

    • Trisha Gura

Career Brief

  • Career Brief |

    US budget woes put non-tenured researchers at risk.

  • Career Brief |

    Proposed law aims to smooth researcher mobility across the European Union.

  • Career Brief |

    Video platform enables global real-time discussion.

Futures

  • Futures |

    A sound investment.

    • Henry Gee
Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter for a daily update on COVID-19 science.
Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing

Search