Reverse Engineering

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  • Semiconducting two-dimensional materials might one day be used in scaled semiconductor technology. Andras Kis recounts how the first transistor based on a single layer of molybdenum disulfide was created.

    • Andras Kis
    Reverse Engineering
  • Neuromorphic engineering aims to create computing hardware that mimics biological nervous systems, and it is expected to play a key role in the next era of hardware development. Carver Mead recounts how it all began.

    • Carver Mead
    Reverse Engineering
  • Computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) seeks to understand and refine the impact of technology on how groups work together. Irene Greif recounts how the field began in 1984 at a meeting stimulated by trends in distributed systems, networks and office automation.

    • Irene Greif
    Reverse Engineering
  • Intel’s Pentium microprocessors have been a feature of computers for over 25 years. Robert P. Colwell, lead designer of the microarchitecture used in the Pentium Pro and beyond, recounts how it all began.

    • Robert P. Colwell
    Reverse Engineering
  • Edge computing processes data on infrastructure that is located close to the point of data creation. Mahadev Satyanarayanan recounts how recognition of the potential limitations of centralized, cloud-based processing led to this new approach to computing.

    • Mahadev Satyanarayanan
    Reverse Engineering
  • Bluetooth allows electronic devices to communicate over short distances and is used by billions of devices worldwide. Jaap Haartsen recalls the developments that led to the establishment of the Bluetooth wireless technology standard.

    • Jaap Haartsen
    Reverse Engineering
  • Spintronic devices, which exploit the spin of electrons for information processing and storage, are a key emerging technology in electronics. Supriyo Datta explains how emulating optical phenomena inspired his prediction of the spin transistor.

    • Supriyo Datta
    Reverse Engineering
  • The spanning tree protocol is a key component of today’s Ethernet. Radia Perlman, inventor of the underlying algorithm, recounts how it was first developed.

    • Radia Perlman
    Reverse Engineering
  • Developments in nanotechnology in the 1990s made building electronic devices from single molecules a possibility. Cees Dekker recounts how his team created a room-temperature transistor based on a single carbon nanotube.

    • Cees Dekker
    Reverse Engineering
  • The discovery of the twisted nematic effect allowed liquid crystal displays to become a practical and ubiquitous technology. Martin Schadt recounts how it came about.

    • Martin Schadt
    Reverse Engineering
  • Thin-film transistors made from indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) are driving the next evolution in active-matrix flat panel displays. Hideo Hosono recounts how demand for a high-performance alternative to amorphous silicon transistors led to their development.

    • Hideo Hosono
    Reverse Engineering
  • The emergence of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) in the 1970s had a huge impact on the future of digital computing. Its inventor, Robert H. Dennard, explains how the drive for simplicity led to this breakthrough.

    • Robert H. Dennard
    Reverse Engineering
  • The memristor — a resistor with memory — was first postulated back in 1971, but it took nearly four decades before it was experimentally confirmed. Leon O. Chua explains how he developed a nonlinear circuit theory in which the memristor emerges naturally as the fourth basic circuit element.

    • Leon O. Chua
    Reverse Engineering
  • An international collaboration between Philips and the Sony Corporation led to the creation of the compact disc. Kees A. Schouhamer Immink explains how it came about.

    • Kees A. Schouhamer Immink
    Reverse Engineering
  • Progress in portable and ubiquitous electronics would not be possible without rechargeable batteries. John B. Goodenough recounts the history of the lithium-ion rechargeable battery.

    • John B. Goodenough
    Reverse Engineering
  • Electronic devices today are untethered and always connected, and wireless networks have enabled this free flow of information. John O’Sullivan details the developments leading up to the establishment of the wireless network standard 802.11a, which is more commonly known as Wi-Fi.

    • John O’Sullivan
    Reverse Engineering
  • The Intel 4004 is renowned as the world’s first commercial microprocessor. Project leader and designer of the 4004, Federico Faggin, retraces the steps leading to its invention.

    • Federico Faggin
    Reverse Engineering