Nature Outlook |

Open innovation

In the fiercely competitive world of drug discovery and development, secrecy is no longer as important as it once was. As it has become more difficult and costly to produce therapies, competitors have begun to view greater collaboration and openness as a way to accelerate and improve the efficiency of research.

For more on open innovation from nature.com, see: nature.com/subjects/drug-discovery-and-development

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A growing appreciation that cooperation and competition can coexist is transforming the life-sciences innovation landscape. Development was once shrouded in secrecy, but now organizations are coming together.

Outlook | | Nature

Drug discovery is time-consuming and full of blind alleys. Pharmaceutical rivals are cooperating in the early stages to accelerate and improve the efficiency of the process.

Outlook | | Nature

In 2006, pharmaceutical innovation consultant Bernard Munos helped to launch a lively public discussion about how open innovation can bring novel drugs to market with his paper 'Can opensource R&D reinvigorate drug research? He tells Nature how things have changed since then.

Outlook | | Nature

In a pioneering move, the compound JQ1 was released to the community for free. The impact that this has had on research and development is slowly coming into focus.

Outlook | | Nature

Advocates say that open science will be good for innovation. One neuroscience institute plans to put that to the test.

Outlook | | Nature

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The quality of the chemical starting points for small-molecule drug discovery is a key factor in improving the likelihood of clinical success. In this article, experts from several organizations involved in drug discovery for malaria, tuberculosis and neglected tropical diseases present disease-specific criteria for hits and leads, and discuss the underlying rationale.

Opinion | | Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

A new model for translational research and drug repositioning has recently been established based on three-way partnerships between public funders, the pharmaceutical industry and academic investigators. This article discusses the progress with two pioneering initiatives — one involving the UK Medical Research Council and one involving the US National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences — and the unique requirements and challenges for this model.

Opinion | | Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

Despite recent progress, only a fraction of the drug industry's shelved compounds are shared with the research community. Could online collaborative research offer a solution?

Editorial | | Nature Biotechnology