Nature Outlook |

Research commercialization

Universities are under pressure to deliver more value for research outlay. Companies are facing competition in the search for the next business-sustaining product. And governments want their economies to grow. Each of these sectors has its own objectives, cultures and strengths, but they are locked together in a synergistic embrace that is fuelling a push to extract commercial value from academic research.

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University research powers innovation and economic development. Countries with intensive research and development (R&D) programmes differ in their approach to turning lab studies into commercial enterprises. By Alla Katsnelson, infographic by Mohamed Ashour.

Outlook | | Nature

Universities aid entrepreneurs by helping them to turn their research into companies. In return, universities can reap financial benefits.

Outlook | | Nature

A broader understanding of 'impact' could help governments to measure the diverse benefits of their investment in research.

Outlook | | Nature

The value that Australia places on publication quality over quantity has elevated it into the top echelon of science. Can it now improve its flagging track record in commercialization?

Outlook | | Nature

After starting one of Germany's first biotech companies, biochemist Horst Domdey co-founded BioM, a non-profit organization that has managed and developed Munich's biotechnology cluster since 1997. He talks to Nature about nurturing the entrepreneurial spirit in “a country of competitions”.

Outlook | | Nature

When it comes to translating its own research into practical applications, China falls short. A forum in Shanghai put the spotlight on ambitious plans to accelerate the process.

Outlook | | Nature

For the past decade, venture philanthropists have been working to propel promising therapies and vaccines into the clinic, with some success.

Outlook | | Nature

Austrian social scientist Helga Nowotny was president of the European Research Council between 2010 and 2013. Now a professor emerita of ETH Zurich and author of The Cunning of Uncertainty (Polity, 2015), Nowotny discusses the growing pressure to capitalize on academic research, and how countries can get it right in the absence of a universal recipe.

Outlook | | Nature

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