Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Alzheimer’s disease

Intermittent fasting to slow down Alzheimer’s disease

In our aging global population and with no effective treatments, the cognitive impairments associated with Alzheimer’s disease represent a major healthcare problem. A recent study in Nature Aging highlights intermittent fasting as a potential way to decrease the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in mice through changes to the gut microbiota.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution

Access options

Rent or buy this article

Get just this article for as long as you need it

$39.95

Prices may be subject to local taxes which are calculated during checkout

Fig. 1: IF attenuates amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment in a mouse model of AD through changes in the microbiota–gut–brain axis.

References

  1. Livingston, G. et al. Lancet 396, 413–446 (2020).

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  2. Long, J. M. & Holtzman, D. M. Cell 179, 312–339 (2019).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  3. Connell, E. et al. Mol. Neurodegener. 17, 43 (2022).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  4. Pan, R.-Y. et al. Nat. Aging, https://doi.org/10.1038/s43587-022-00311-y (2022).

  5. Braak, H., Braak, E. & Bohl, J. Eur. Neurol. 33, 403–408 (1993).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  6. Bercik, P. et al. Gastroenterology 141, 599–609 (2011).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  7. Kowalski, K. & Mulak, A. J. Neurogastroenterol. Motil. 25, 48–60 (2019).

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  8. Kim, N. et al. Brain Behav. Immun. 98, 357–365 (2021).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  9. Mattson, M. P., Moehl, K., Ghena, N., Schmaedick, M. & Cheng, A. Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 19, 81–94 (2018).

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Liu, Z. et al. Nat. Commun. 11, 855 (2020).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  11. Oakley, H. et al. J. Neurosci. 26, 10129–10140 (2006).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  12. Vogt, N. M. et al. Sci. Rep. 7, 13537 (2017).

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  13. Horgusluoglu, E. et al. Alzheimers Dement. 18, 1260–1278 (2022).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  14. Price, J. L. & Morris, J. C. Ann. Neurol. 45, 358–368 (1999).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  15. Berron, D. et al. J. Neurosci. 39, 8788–8797 (2019).

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors receive funding from Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) under grant number SFI/FFP/6820. Y.M.N. is funded Investigator of the APC Microbiome Ireland.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Yvonne M. Nolan.

Ethics declarations

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Nicolas, S., Nolan, Y.M. Intermittent fasting to slow down Alzheimer’s disease. Nat Aging 2, 982–983 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43587-022-00320-x

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43587-022-00320-x

Search

Quick links

Nature Briefing

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing