Autoimmunity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus

Abstract

Impressive progress has been made over the last several years toward understanding how almost every aspect of the immune system contributes to the expression of systemic autoimmunity. In parallel, studies have shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to organ inflammation and damage. New approaches that address the complicated interaction between genetic variants, epigenetic processes, sex and the environment promise to enlighten the multitude of pathways that lead to what is clinically defined as systemic lupus erythematosus. It is expected that each patient owns a unique ‘interactome’, which will dictate specific treatment.

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Fig. 1: The pathogenetic landscape of SLE.
Fig. 2: T cell early and late signaling aberrations in T cells from patients with SLE.

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Acknowledgements

I thank my colleagues current and past who have helped me acquire a better understanding of this formidable disease known as lupus. I want to thank M. Tsokos for her support and feedback during the preparation of this report and N. Plummer for helping with the assembly of references. The work in my laboratory has been supported by the NIH.

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Tsokos, G.C. Autoimmunity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus. Nat Immunol 21, 605–614 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41590-020-0677-6

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