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Optical imaging: Resolutely deep and fast

Functionalized quantum dots emitting short-wavelength infrared light enable small-animal imaging with deep penetration, high spatial resolution and fast acquisition speeds.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Eva M. Sevick-Muraca is at the Center for Molecular Imaging, The Brown Foundation of Molecular Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center, 1825 Pressler Street, SRB 330A, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

    • Eva M. Sevick-Muraca

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Eva M. Sevick-Muraca.