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Echoes of ancient DNA in living modern humans affect risk for neuropsychiatric disease and brain structure and function of networks subserving higher-order cognition

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References

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Funding

MDG and KFB are supported by the NIMH Intramural Research Program (ZIAMH002652, ZIAMH002942 and ZIAMH002717).

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MDG and KFB wrote the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Michael D. Gregory or Karen F. Berman.

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Gregory, M.D., Berman, K.F. Echoes of ancient DNA in living modern humans affect risk for neuropsychiatric disease and brain structure and function of networks subserving higher-order cognition. Neuropsychopharmacol. (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-022-01396-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-022-01396-0

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