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Further evidence that MRI based measurement of midbrain neuromelanin may serve as a proxy measure of brain dopamine activity in psychiatric disorders

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Correspondence to Cameron S. Carter.

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Carter, C.S. Further evidence that MRI based measurement of midbrain neuromelanin may serve as a proxy measure of brain dopamine activity in psychiatric disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 1231–1232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-020-00944-w

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