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Gastrointestinal imaging in 2015

Emerging trends in endoscopic imaging

Several key papers published in 2015 highlight important emerging trends in endoscopic imaging that promise to improve patient diagnosis and guidance of therapy. These studies reflect the future role for 'smart' contrast agents and fluorescence endoscopes to provide a molecular basis for disease detection, identify precancerous lesions and determine optimal choice of therapy.

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Figure 1: Diseases throughout the digestive tract are being evaluated in vivo with new endoscopic imaging technologies that identify molecular changes.

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Acknowledgements

T.D.W. is funded in part by NIH U54 CA163059, U01 CA189291, R01 CA142750, R01 CA200007, and R01 EB020644 grants.

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Correspondence to Thomas D. Wang.

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Joshi, B., Wang, T. Emerging trends in endoscopic imaging. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 13, 72–73 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2015.214

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