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Functions and dysfunctions of neocortical inhibitory neuron subtypes

Nature Neuroscience volume 20, pages 11991208 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Neocortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkably diverse morphology, physiological properties and connectivity. Genetic access to molecularly defined subtypes of inhibitory neurons has aided their functional characterization in recent years. These studies have established that, instead of simply balancing excitatory neuron activity, inhibitory neurons actively shape excitatory circuits in a subtype-specific manner. We review the emerging view that inhibitory neuron subtypes perform context-dependent modulation of excitatory activity, as well as regulate experience-dependent plasticity of excitatory circuits. We then review the roles of neuromodulators in regulating the subtype-specific functions of inhibitory neurons. Finally, we discuss the idea that dysfunctions of inhibitory neuron subtypes may be responsible for various aspects of neurological disorders.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the NIH (R01 NS091010A, R01 EY025349, R01 DC014690 and U01 NS094342), Pew Charitable Trusts, David & Lucile Packard Foundation, McKnight Foundation and New York Stem Cell Foundation to T.K., from the NIH (DC009635 and DC012557), Pew Charitable Trusts, McKnight Foundation and HHMI Faculty Scholars Program to R.C.F., and from the NIH (DC05014) to K.V.K.

Author information

Author notes

    • Ryoma Hattori
    •  & Kishore V Kuchibhotla

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. Neurobiology Section, Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior, and Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.

    • Ryoma Hattori
    •  & Takaki Komiyama
  2. Skirball Institute, Neuroscience Institute, Departments of Otolaryngology, Neuroscience and Physiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

    • Kishore V Kuchibhotla
    •  & Robert C Froemke
  3. Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, New York, USA.

    • Kishore V Kuchibhotla
    •  & Robert C Froemke
  4. Johns Hopkins University, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Baltimore, MD, USA.

    • Kishore V Kuchibhotla

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Robert C Froemke or Takaki Komiyama.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.4619

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