Review Article | Published:

Global control of hepatitis C: where challenge meets opportunity

Nature Medicine volume 19, pages 850858 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

We are entering an important new chapter in the story of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. There are clear challenges and opportunities. On the one hand, new HCV infections are still occurring, and an estimated 185 million people are or have previously been infected worldwide. Most HCV-infected persons are unaware of their status yet are at risk for life-threatening diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whose incidences are predicted to rise in the coming decade. On the other hand, new HCV infections can be prevented, and those that have already occurred can be detected and treated—viral eradication is even possible. How the story ends will largely be determined by the extent to which these rapidly advancing opportunities overcome the growing challenges and by the vigor of the public health response.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by US National Institutes of Health grant R01 DA013324.

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Affiliations

  1. Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

    • David L Thomas

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Competing interests

D.L.T. has served on a scientific advisory board for Gilead and Jansen; his university has received support for his research from Merck and Gilead.

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Correspondence to David L Thomas.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.3184

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