Review Article | Published:

Interleukin 17 is a chief orchestrator of immunity

Nature Immunology volume 18, pages 612621 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Increased understanding of the biology of interleukin 17 (IL-17) has revealed that this cytokine is a central player in immunity at the sites most exposed to microorganisms. Although it has been strongly associated with immunopathology, IL-17 also has an important role in host defense. The regulation of IL-17 secretion seems to be shared among various cell types, each of which can concomitantly secrete additional products. IL-17 has only modest activity on its own; its impact in immunity arises from its synergistic action with other factors, its self-sustaining feedback loop and, in some cases, its role as a counterpart of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Together these attributes provide a robust response against microorganisms, but they can equally contribute to immune pathology. Here we focus on a discussion of the role of IL-17 during infection.

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Acknowledgements

M.V. receives funding via the European Union H2020 ERA project (no. 667824–EXCELLtoINNOV).

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  1. Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.

    • Marc Veldhoen

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Marc Veldhoen.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.3742

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