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Solving vaccine mysteries: a systems biology perspective

Nature Immunology volume 12, pages 729731 (2011) | Download Citation

  • An Erratum to this article was published on 18 May 2012

This article has been updated

Systems biology has emerged as a promising research strategy that can be applied to vaccine development. This approach can lead to the identification of new mechanisms and predictors of inactivated vaccine immunogenicity.

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  • 10 November 2011

    In the version of this article initially published, the volume number for reference 2 was incorrect. The correct volume number is 12. The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Lydie Trautmann and Rafick-Pierre Sekaly are with the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute of Florida, Port Saint Lucie, Florida, USA.

    • Lydie Trautmann
    •  & Rafick-Pierre Sekaly

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rafick-Pierre Sekaly.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2078

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