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Self-Assembling Nanostructures

Bio/Technology volume 11, pages 15341536 (1993) | Download Citation

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Abstract

A new generation of biomaterials will, by design, harness the power of surfaces to direct specific processes

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References

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    The modification of nanoparticles with a carbohydrate monolayer described here should be distinguished from the technique of Schröder et al. (U.S. Patent ♯4,501,726), who describe the production of large (>1500 nm) magnetic nanoparticles embedded within a covalently linked carbohydrate matrix. It should also be distinguished from efforts by Illum et al. (U.S. Patent ♯5,904,479) to coat colloidal particles with amphipalhic molecules that will prevent RES uptake via steric hindrance and decreased serum protein binding. The carbohydrates create a glassy film and as dehydroprotectants.

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Affiliations

  1. The authors are in the biomaterials bioreactivity characterization laboratory, department of pathology and laboratory medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024-1732. e-mail: nkossovs@pathology.medsch.ucla.edu.

    • Nir Kossovsky
    • , David Millett
    • , Andrew Gelman
    • , Ed Sponsler
    •  & H. James Hnatyszyn

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt1293-1534