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Increased baculovirus susceptibility of armyworm larvae feeding on transgenic rice plants expressing an entomopoxvirus gene

Nature Biotechnology volume 17, pages 11221124 (1999) | Download Citation

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Abstract

We have introduced an entomopoxvirus gene encoding a virus enhancing factor (EF) into rice, which resulted in high-level accumulation of the EF in the transgenic plants. The introduced gene was stably inherited in the progeny of the primary transformants, as shown by analysis of their genomic DNA. Bioassays for insect susceptibility to baculovirus infection showed that armyworm larvae feeding on the transgenic rice had increased susceptibility to a Nucleopolyhedrovirus. Thus, introduction of the EF gene into plants can be used as a strategy to increase the effectiveness of baculoviruses in insect pest management.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Mr. Y. Hayashi at Plantech Research Institute for his cooperation in transformation experiments. This research was supported in part by a grant from the Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technical Information Society, Japan, and the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Japan.

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Affiliations

  1. College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Kameino, Fujisawa 252-8510, Japan.

    • Tosihiko Hukuhara
  2. Plantech Research Institute, 1000 Kamoshida, Aoba-ku, Yokohama 227-0033, Japan.

    • Takahiko Hayakawa
  3. Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

    • Arman Wijonarko

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Correspondence to Tosihiko Hukuhara.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/15110