Microbiota

A high-pressure situation for bacteria

Analyses in mice suggest that dietary salt increases blood pressure partly by affecting some of the microbes that inhabit the gut. The implications of this work for hypertension warrant further study in humans. See Article p.585

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Figure 1: A possible role for gut microbes in regulating blood pressure in mice.

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Correspondence to David A. Relman.

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Relman, D. A high-pressure situation for bacteria. Nature 551, 571–572 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature24760

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