Review Article | Published:

Diet–microbiota interactions as moderators of human metabolism

Nature volume 535, pages 5664 (07 July 2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

It is widely accepted that obesity and associated metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, are intimately linked to diet. However, the gut microbiota has also become a focus for research at the intersection of diet and metabolic health. Mechanisms that link the gut microbiota with obesity are coming to light through a powerful combination of translation-focused animal models and studies in humans. A body of knowledge is accumulating that points to the gut microbiota as a mediator of dietary impact on the host metabolic status. Efforts are focusing on the establishment of causal relationships in people and the prospect of therapeutic interventions such as personalized nutrition.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank members of the Sonnenburg and Bäckhed laboratories for discussions. This work was funded by a grant from the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases NIDDK (R01-DK085025 to J.L.S.) and grants from the Swedish Research Council and the Novo Nordisk Foundation to F.B. F.B. is a recipient of a European Research Council Consolidator Grant (615362-METABASE).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

    • Justin L. Sonnenburg
  2. Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.

    • Fredrik Bäckhed
  3. Section for Metabolic Receptology, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.

    • Fredrik Bäckhed

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Justin L. Sonnenburg or Fredrik Bäckhed.

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