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Evolutionary biology

To mimicry and back again

Nature volume 534, pages 184185 (09 June 2016) | Download Citation

Deadly coral snakes warn predators through striking red-black banding. New data confirm that many harmless snakes have evolved to resemble coral snakes, and suggest that the evolution of this Batesian mimicry is not always a one-way street.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. David W. Pfennig is in the Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.

    • David W. Pfennig

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Correspondence to David W. Pfennig.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18441

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