Review Article | Published:

Pharmacogenomics in the clinic

Nature volume 526, pages 343350 (15 October 2015) | Download Citation

Abstract

After decades of discovery, inherited variations have been identified in approximately 20 genes that affect about 80 medications and are actionable in the clinic. And some somatically acquired genetic variants direct the choice of 'targeted' anticancer drugs for individual patients. Current efforts that focus on the processes required to appropriately act on pharmacogenomic variability in the clinic are moving away from discovery and towards implementation of an evidenced-based strategy for improving the use of medications, thereby providing a cornerstone for precision medicine.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank their many colleagues who have collaborated in research to elucidate the pharmacogenomics of medications used to treat their patients, as well as those who have collaborated to translate pharmacogenomics to optimize the care of patients. They also thank the many patients and parents who have willingly participated in their research. This work was supported in part by NIH grants P50 GM115279, RO1 CA36401, R24 GM115264, RO1 CA142665, P30 CA21765 and by the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities.

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  1. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105-2794, USA.

    • Mary V. Relling
    •  & William E. Evans

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Competing interests

The authors receive royalties from patent rights licensed by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in relation to TPMT genetic testing.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Mary V. Relling.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature15817

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