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Correlation between Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Arterial Compliance and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Elderly Patients with Arteriosclerosis

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate an association between major cardiovascular risk factors and each of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), ankle-brachial index (ABI), capacitive arterial compliance (C1), and oscillatory arterial compliance (C2) in elderly patients with arteriosclerosis. We analyzed 160 elderly patients with arteriosclerosis. Vessel wall properties were assessed by baPWV and ABI using a VP-1000 Automatic Arteriosclerosis Measurement System, and C1 and C2 were measured using a DO-2020 Cardiovascular Profiling Instrument. In multiple regression analysis, baPWV was significantly correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean artery pressure, pulse pressure, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), age, and heart rate (r=0.670, 0.627, 0.580, 0.523, 0.490, 0.200; p<0.05), ABI was significantly correlated with pulse pressure, SBP and age (r=−0.250, −0.206, −0.168; p<0.05), C1 was significantly correlated with pulse pressure, SBP, mean artery pressure, age, DBP and heart rate (r=−0.481, −0.469, −0.363, −0.356, −0.239, −0.188; p<0.05), and C2 was significantly correlated with age, SBP, pulse pressure, DBP, fasting blood glucose, mean artery pressure and heart rate (r=−0.411, −0.395, −0.383, −0.277, −0.213, −0.183, −0.173; p<0.05). There were no close correlations between baPWV, ABI, or C1 and fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, or body mass index. Moreover, there were significant correlations between baPWV and C1 (r=−0.444, p<0.001), and between baPWV and C2 (r=−0.257, p<0.01). In conclusion, these findings underscore the efficacy of baPWV and ABI in identifying the vascular damage of the aged.

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Correspondence to Haiqing Gao.

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Li, B., Gao, H., Li, X. et al. Correlation between Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Arterial Compliance and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Elderly Patients with Arteriosclerosis. Hypertens Res 29, 309–314 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1291/hypres.29.309

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Keywords

  • brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity
  • ankle-brachial index
  • capacitive arterial compliance
  • oscillatory arterial compliance
  • arteriosclerosis

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