Original Article | Published:

Loss of asparagine synthetase suppresses the growth of human lung cancer cells by arresting cell cycle at G0/G1 phase

Cancer Gene Therapy volume 23, pages 287294 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

The aim of this research is to determine the role of human asparagine synthetase (ASNS) in human lung cancer. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining and the Oncomine database mining showed that the expression of ASNS gene was higher in lung cancer tissues than that in the normal tissues by. In addition, western blot assay showed that ASNS was elevated in lung cancer A549 and 95D cell lines as compared with that in H1299 and H460 cells. Therefore, A549 and 95D cells were chosen for subsequent MTT and colony formation assay. It was found that knockdown of ASNS inhibited the growth and colony formation abilities of A549 and 95D cells. Flow cytometry showed that ASNS silencing arrested cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase in A549 cells, probably through regulating the expression of cell cycle molecules such as CDK2 and Cyclin E1 as shown by quantitative real-time PCR. Taken together, our study indicates that ASNS may be an important target for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81572246).

Author information

Author notes

    • Yi Xu
    •  & Fanzhen Lv

    Fanzhen Lv and Yi Xu contributed equally to this study and should be regarded as co-first authors.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Respiration, The Affiliated Huadong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China

    • Yi Xu
  2. Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Huadong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China

    • Fanzhen Lv
    • , Xunxia Zhu
    • , Yun Wu
    •  & Xiaoyong Shen

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Xiaoyong Shen.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/cgt.2016.28

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