Glial development

Definition

Glial development is the biological process by which glial cells – which comprise most of the non-neuronal cells present in the nervous system and include oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and Schwann cells – are produced during development. The processes that contribute to glial development include proliferation, differentiation and migration.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    The Hippo pathway has recently been implicated in Schwann cell (SC) development and myelination. Here the authors reveal mechanistic insights into how TAZ and YAP regulate and interact with target genes; they further identify a negative feedback loop between TAZ/YAP and G protein Gαs that balances SC proliferation and differentiation.

    • Yaqi Deng
    • , Lai Man Natalie Wu
    • , Shujun Bai
    • , Chuntao Zhao
    • , Haibo Wang
    • , Jincheng Wang
    • , Lingli Xu
    • , Masahide Sakabe
    • , Wenhao Zhou
    • , Mei Xin
    •  & Q. Richard Lu
  • Research |

    By studying a severe neuropathy in mice, Quintes, Brinkmann et al. demonstrate that the nuclear zinc-finger protein Zeb2 (Sip1) is essential for Schwann cell differentiation and myelin synthesis. Since Zeb2-deficient Schwann cells continuously express repressors of lineage progression, ‘inhibiting the inhibitors’ emerges as a new principle of peripheral myelination control.

    • Susanne Quintes
    • , Bastian G Brinkmann
    • , Madlen Ebert
    • , Franziska Fröb
    • , Theresa Kungl
    • , Friederike A Arlt
    • , Victor Tarabykin
    • , Danny Huylebroeck
    • , Dies Meijer
    • , Ueli Suter
    • , Michael Wegner
    • , Michael W Sereda
    •  & Klaus-Armin Nave
    Nature Neuroscience 19, 1050–1059
  • Research |

    This study shows that the transcriptional regulator Zeb2 is required for the onset of peripheral myelination and remyelination. Zeb2 recruits HDAC1–HDAC2–NuRD co-repressor complexes to antagonize inhibitory effectors including Notch, while activating promyelinogenic factors. A Mowat-Wilson syndrome–associated ZEB2 mutation disrupting HDAC–NuRD interaction abolishes Zeb2 activity for Schwann cell differentiation.

    • Lai Man Natalie Wu
    • , Jincheng Wang
    • , Andrea Conidi
    • , Chuntao Zhao
    • , Haibo Wang
    • , Zachary Ford
    • , Liguo Zhang
    • , Christiane Zweier
    • , Brian G Ayee
    • , Patrice Maurel
    • , An Zwijsen
    • , Jonah R Chan
    • , Michael P Jankowski
    • , Danny Huylebroeck
    •  & Q Richard Lu
    Nature Neuroscience 19, 1060–1072
  • Research |

    Cells respond to mechanical signals during development and after injury. Poitelon et al. report for the first time that myelin-forming glia activate the Hippo pathway effectors Yap and Taz in response to mechanical stimuli, and that they are required for Schwann cell development and myelination in vivo.

    • Yannick Poitelon
    • , Camila Lopez-Anido
    • , Kathleen Catignas
    • , Caterina Berti
    • , Marilena Palmisano
    • , Courtney Williamson
    • , Dominique Ameroso
    • , Kansho Abiko
    • , Yoonchan Hwang
    • , Alex Gregorieff
    • , Jeffrey L Wrana
    • , Mohammadnabi Asmani
    • , Ruogang Zhao
    • , Fraser James Sim
    • , Lawrence Wrabetz
    • , John Svaren
    •  & Maria Laura Feltri
    Nature Neuroscience 19, 879–887
  • Research |

    Using zebrafish, the authors show that neuronal activity influences which axons are selected for myelination by promoting the growth and stability of oligodendrocyte sheaths on axons. Myelination of axons in response to activity could modulate the conduction properties of specific neural circuits, thereby contributing to brain plasticity.

    • Jacob H Hines
    • , Andrew M Ravanelli
    • , Rani Schwindt
    • , Ethan K Scott
    •  & Bruce Appel
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 683–689

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