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Economics: Corruption made visible

Many countries around the world have serious corruption problems at the expense of public welfare. An experimental economic study now identifies conditions that encourage leaders to accept bribes instead of sanctioning free-riders. Possible anti-corruption strategies can have positive effects, fail or even backfire.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Manfred Milinski is in the Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, August-Thienemann-Strasse, 24306 Plön, Germany.

    • Manfred Milinski

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Manfred Milinski.