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How scalable is sustainable intensification?

Sustainable intensification is a concept of growing importance, yet it is in danger of becoming scientifically obsolete because of the diversity of meanings it has acquired. To avoid this, it is important to consider the various scales on which it can aid progress towards feeding human populations while also protecting the environment.

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Acknowledgements

This work was funded by Defra as part of the Sustainable Intensification Research Platform. Improvements to the manuscript were suggested by members of the SIP Science Conference 2016 and by B. Kunin, C. M. Jones, C. Marsh, Y. Gavish and D. Salgado.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

    • Richard M. Gunton
    •  & Leslie G. Firbank
  2. Department of Politics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4RJ, UK.

    • Alex Inman
    •  & D. Michael Winter
  3. Land, Environment, Economics and Policy Institute, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4PJ, UK.

    • D. Michael Winter

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Leslie G. Firbank.