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Newton and the ascent of water in plants

Nature Plants volume 1, Article number: 15005 (2015) | Download Citation

Buried in a notebook from his undergraduate days lie Newton's musings on the movement of sap in trees. Viewed in conjunction with our modern understanding of plant hydrodynamics, his speculations seem prescient.

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Affiliations

  1. David Beerling is in the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.

    • David J. Beerling

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Correspondence to David J. Beerling.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nplants.2015.5

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