Ebola virus

Ebola virus is an infectious agent and one of the viruses that can cause haemorraghic fever, a severe infectious disease characterized by high fever and bleeding, in humans and some monkeys. The first infections with this viral genus were reported in Zaire, close to the river Ebola.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Current experimental monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Ebola virus (EBOV) post-exposure immunotherapy are ineffective against Sudan (SUDV) or Marburg virus (MARV). Here, authors develop cocktails of mAbs that protect nonhuman primates against EBOV, SUDV, and MARV infection when given four days post infection.

    • Jennifer M. Brannan
    • , Shihua He
    • , Katie A. Howell
    • , Laura I. Prugar
    • , Wenjun Zhu
    • , Hong Vu
    • , Sergey Shulenin
    • , Shweta Kailasan
    • , Henna Raina
    • , Gary Wong
    • , Md Niaz Rahim
    • , Logan Banadyga
    • , Kevin Tierney
    • , Xuelian Zhao
    • , Yuxing Li
    • , Frederick W. Holtsberg
    • , John M. Dye
    • , Xiangguo Qiu
    •  & M. Javad Aman
  • Research |

    Near-atomic resolution cryo-electron microscopy structures of the Zaire ebolavirus nucleoprotein indicate a complex transition from the RNA-free to RNA-bound forms of the protein, and reveal the mechanism of oligomer formation and helical assembly.

    • Yukihiko Sugita
    • , Hideyuki Matsunami
    • , Yoshihiro Kawaoka
    • , Takeshi Noda
    •  & Matthias Wolf
    Nature 563, 137-140
  • Reviews |

    The virulence of viruses is a major determinant of the health burden of viral infections in humans and other species. In this article, Geoghegan and Holmes discuss how largely disparate research fields — theoretical modelling of virulence evolution and experimental dissection of genetic virulence determinants in laboratory model systems — can be bridged by considering real genomic data of viral evolution in a phylogenetic context. They describe the underlying principles of virulence evolution and how they apply to real-world viral infections and outbreaks of global importance.

    • Jemma L. Geoghegan
    •  & Edward C. Holmes
  • Research | | open

    The Ebola virus glycoprotein is a target for cross-protective antibodies. Here, Janus et al. report the crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a pan-reactive antibody bound to a conserved epitope of the glycoprotein, facilitating rational design of cross-protective vaccines and therapeutics.

    • Benjamin M. Janus
    • , Nydia van Dyk
    • , Xuelian Zhao
    • , Katie A. Howell
    • , Cinque Soto
    • , M. Javad Aman
    • , Yuxing Li
    • , Thomas R. Fuerst
    •  & Gilad Ofek
  • Research |

    Genomic characterization of a new ebolavirus, detected in free-tailed bats in Sierra Leone, whose viral glycoprotein can mediate entry into human cells.

    • Tracey Goldstein
    • , Simon J. Anthony
    • , Aiah Gbakima
    • , Brian H. Bird
    • , James Bangura
    • , Alexandre Tremeau-Bravard
    • , Manjunatha N. Belaganahalli
    • , Heather L. Wells
    • , Jasjeet K. Dhanota
    • , Eliza Liang
    • , Michael Grodus
    • , Rohit K. Jangra
    • , Veronica A. DeJesus
    • , Gorka Lasso
    • , Brett R. Smith
    • , Amara Jambai
    • , Brima O. Kamara
    • , Sorie Kamara
    • , William Bangura
    • , Corina Monagin
    • , Sagi Shapira
    • , Christine K. Johnson
    • , Karen Saylors
    • , Edward M. Rubin
    • , Kartik Chandran
    • , W. Ian Lipkin
    •  & Jonna A. K. Mazet
    Nature Microbiology 3, 1084-1089
  • Research | | open

    During the last Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, a large amount of viral genomic data was obtained. Here, Dellicour et al. use phylodynamic approaches to assess effect of intervention strategies such as border closures.

    • Simon Dellicour
    • , Guy Baele
    • , Gytis Dudas
    • , Nuno R. Faria
    • , Oliver G. Pybus
    • , Marc A. Suchard
    • , Andrew Rambaut
    •  & Philippe Lemey

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