Antiparasitic agents

Antiparasitic agents are drugs used to treat parasitic diseases. Parasites can live on or in a host and feed off of it. Human parasites include protozoa, flatworms, roundworms and ectoparasites such as ticks, fleas, lice, and mites. They cause diseases such as malaria, trichomoniasis and Leishmaniasis.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Sexual forms of malaria parasites are responsible for transmission to the mosquito. Anti-malarial drug resistance remains a serious problem and requires advent of new drug therapies. Here, the authors present a high-throughput screen of potential antimalarial compounds, identifying seventeen drug-like molecules specifically targeting transmission.

    • Michael J. Delves
    • , Celia Miguel-Blanco
    • , Holly Matthews
    • , Irene Molina
    • , Andrea Ruecker
    • , Sabrina Yahiya
    • , Ursula Straschil
    • , Matthew Abraham
    • , María Luisa León
    • , Oliver J. Fischer
    • , Ainoa Rueda-Zubiaurre
    • , Jochen R. Brandt
    • , Álvaro Cortés
    • , Anna Barnard
    • , Matthew J. Fuchter
    • , Félix Calderón
    • , Elizabeth A. Winzeler
    • , Robert E. Sinden
    • , Esperanza Herreros
    • , Francisco J. Gamo
    •  & Jake Baum
  • Research | | open

    Artemisinin (ART) is a widely used antimalarial drug, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Here, Bridgford et al. show that ART kills parasites by a two-pronged mechanism, causing protein damage and compromising proteasome function, and that accumulation of proteasome substrates activates the ER stress response.

    • Jessica L. Bridgford
    • , Stanley C. Xie
    • , Simon A. Cobbold
    • , Charisse Flerida A. Pasaje
    • , Susann Herrmann
    • , Tuo Yang
    • , David L. Gillett
    • , Lawrence R. Dick
    • , Stuart A. Ralph
    • , Con Dogovski
    • , Natalie J. Spillman
    •  & Leann Tilley
  • Research | | open

    Increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum strains to piperaquine (PPQ) in Southeast Asia is of concern and resistance mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, Ross et al. show that mutations in the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter are rapidly increasing in prevalence in Cambodia and confer resistance to PPQ.

    • Leila S. Ross
    • , Satish K. Dhingra
    • , Sachel Mok
    • , Tomas Yeo
    • , Kathryn J. Wicht
    • , Krittikorn Kümpornsin
    • , Shannon Takala-Harrison
    • , Benoit Witkowski
    • , Rick M. Fairhurst
    • , Frederic Ariey
    • , Didier Menard
    •  & David A. Fidock
  • Reviews |

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic infection caused by Schistosoma spp. flatworms. Transmission of the infection occurs via contact with contaminated water, and the disease is most prevalent in areas with limited access to safe drinking water and sanitation.

    • Donald P. McManus
    • , David W. Dunne
    • , Moussa Sacko
    • , Jürg Utzinger
    • , Birgitte J. Vennervald
    •  & Xiao-Nong Zhou

News and Comment