Collections

  • Series |

    In this article series, Nature Reviews Microbiology explores the relationship between microorganisms and global change, and considers the wider environmental and health challenges.

    Image: Johan Swanepoel / Alamy Stock Photo
  • Milestone |

    The human body is home to trillions of microorganisms, which have direct and indirect impacts on health and disease. The microbiota that resides in our mucosal surfaces, such as the skin, mouth, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts, is a diverse community of bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, which collectively have 100-fold more genes that their human host.

  • Collection |

    This collection combines published Research articles and Reviews from several Nature journals highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the role of the gut microbiota in health and disease, and the tools for studying these complex communities.

    Image: Brain light / Alamy Stock Photo
  • Milestone |

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) – the etiologic agent of AIDS – is one of the most intensively studied disease organism in history. Since its first identification in the early 1980s, HIV has transformed into a pandemic, globally infecting more 36 million people and annually contributing to the deaths of hundreds of thousands of patients – particularly in low income countries.

    Image: Chris Ryan
  • Collection |

    Popularization of super-resolution imaging techniques has allowed cell biologists to probe cell structure and function in previously unattainable detail. These methodologies continue to evolve, with new improvements that allow tailoring the available techniques to a particular need and application. This collection showcases primary research articles, reviews and protocols and highlights these recent developments by exemplifying the new, interesting applications of super-resolution microscopy as well as related tool development.

    Image: Bertocchi et al., Nature Cell Biology volume 19, pages 28–37 (2017).
  • Focus |

    In this Focus issue on biogeochemistry, Nature Reviews Microbiology highlights the metabolic versatility in microbial communities and the significance of microbial contributions to the flow of elements in Earth’s biogeochemical cycles.

    Image: Philip Patenall/Macmillan Publishers Limited
  • Collection |

    Image: Reinhard Dirscherl/Alamy Stock Photo
  • Collection |

    This collection marks the 100th anniversary of the 1918 influenza pandemic Included are Reviews and research articles from across the Nature group of journals to showcase the latest advances in our understanding of influenza virus biology, evolution and adaptation, and advances in surveillance and drug and vaccine development.

    Image: Philip Patenall
  • Series |

    In this series of articles, Nature Reviews Microbiology explores the insights that have been gained from a flurry of research into the origin, evolution and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens, the identification of resistance markers, the mechanistic links between the drug target and the associated resistant mutations, the need to improve quantitative risk assessment and the surveillance of resistance gene distribution, as well as the latest developments in antimicrobial drug discovery to produce the next generation of new, safe and effective antimicrobials.

    Image: Philip Patenall
  • Collection |

    This collection consists of Reviews, Research articles, and News and Comment articles from several Nature journals, describing how antibiotic resistance emerges and detailing strategies through which new antimicrobial compounds are being discovered.

  • Focus |

    In this Focus issue, Nature Reviews Microbiology highlights some of the mechanisms that regulate bacterial population dynamics, and explores how growth depends on environmental conditions, for example in biofilms, the microbiota or states of low energy.

    Image: Getty Images/Hemera / Thinkstock \ Kheng ho Toh
  • Collection |

    The collection combines Reviews and Research articles recently published across several Nature journals. It also includes links to additional content, including a Nature webinar that marked the 2015 World AIDS Day: “Eliminating HIV: bringing together prevention, treatment and cure”, featuring Steven Deeks (UCSF), Susan Buchbinder (UCSF) and Robert Siliciano (Johns Hopkins).

    Image: Philip Patenall