Dámaso Torres, Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2, a center of BIST and CSIC)

March issue out now

In this issue, we present a Focus on multiferroics and applications. We also highlight articles on graphene-based brain interfaces, DNA that solves a maze, and quantum correlation in polaritons.

Latest Research

  • Review Article |

    Magnetoelectric multiferroics, where magnetic properties are manipulated by electric field and vice versa, could lead to improved electronic devices. Here, advances in materials, characterisation and modelling, and usage in applications are reviewed.

    • N. A. Spaldin
    •  & R. Ramesh
  • Article |

    A modulation of the magnetic exchange interaction using an electric field, in the absence of atomic displacement and not relying on spin–orbit coupling, is reported.

    • Maria Fittipaldi
    • , Alberto Cini
    • , Giuseppe Annino
    • , Alessandro Vindigni
    • , Andrea Caneschi
    •  & Roberta Sessoli
  • Letter |

    Confined exciton–polaritons in semiconductor-based quantum wells can give rise to correlations slightly below the level of classical coincidence counts under resonant excitation, such that single or few polariton excitations are sufficient to modify the statistics of the radiation going through the system.

    • Aymeric Delteil
    • , Thomas Fink
    • , Anne Schade
    • , Sven Höfling
    • , Christian Schneider
    •  & Ataç İmamoğlu
  • Article |

    Spin–orbit torque is used to control the magnetic exchange bias in a Pt/Co/IrMn trilayer.

    • Po-Hung Lin
    • , Bo-Yuan Yang
    • , Ming-Han Tsai
    • , Po-Chuan Chen
    • , Kuo-Feng Huang
    • , Hsiu-Hau Lin
    •  & Chih-Huang Lai
  • Article |

    A method to accelerate the generation of kidney organoids from human pluripotent stem cells cultured in a three-dimensional environment and exposed to inductive stimuli has been developed, with the organoids capable of recapitulating kidney organogenesis.

    • Elena Garreta
    • , Patricia Prado
    • , Carolina Tarantino
    • , Roger Oria
    • , Lucia Fanlo
    • , Elisa Martí
    • , Dobryna Zalvidea
    • , Xavier Trepat
    • , Pere Roca-Cusachs
    • , Aleix Gavaldà-Navarro
    • , Luca Cozzuto
    • , Josep M. Campistol
    • , Juan Carlos Izpisúa Belmonte
    • , Carmen Hurtado del Pozo
    •  & Nuria Montserrat
  • Letter |

    Two-photon correlation measurements in a resonantly excited fibre-cavity polariton system stay below the classical limit for zero time delay, suggesting quantum correlations between the polaritons.

    • Guillermo Muñoz-Matutano
    • , Andrew Wood
    • , Mattias Johnsson
    • , Xavier Vidal
    • , Ben Q. Baragiola
    • , Andreas Reinhard
    • , Aristide Lemaître
    • , Jacqueline Bloch
    • , Alberto Amo
    • , Gilles Nogues
    • , Benjamin Besga
    • , Maxime Richard
    •  & Thomas Volz

News & Comment

  • Q&A |

    Nian Sun, a professor at Northeastern University (Electrical and Computer Engineering Department), talks to Nature Materials about the potential applications of multiferroic materials, and issues associated with commercializing these technologies.

    • Stephen Shevlin
  • News & Views |

    Multiferroic quantum criticality — associated with the merging of two distinct quantum critical points — is explored, with implications for fundamental physics and low-temperature applications.

    • Premala Chandra
  • News & Views |

    Microparticle debris from prosthetic implants has been shown to induce a type 2 inflammatory response through a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase-dependent signalling pathway.

    • Dimitri A. de Kouchkovsky
    • , Sourav Ghosh
    •  & Carla V. Rothlin
  • Editorial |

    Much academic and industrial effort has been devoted to the study of multiferroics, but if related technologies are to have real-world impact, market awareness and reproducibility are also key.

  • Comment |

    Topological structures have considerable potential in nanoelectronics and new device concepts. They are key to the design and understanding of novel functionalities in ferroic materials — that is, materials that have one or more types of built-in order such as magnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic and multiferroic materials.

    • Jan Seidel

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