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  • The electrolyte is an indispensable component in any electrochemical device. In Li-ion batteries, the electrolyte development experienced a tortuous pathway closely associated with the evolution of electrode chemistries.

    • Kang Xu
    Tales of Invention
  • Ambitious emission reduction targets from governments and businesses revive hope in a political solution to climate change, but need to be examined rigorously.

    Editorial
  • Li4Ti5O12 spinel was initially investigated as a cathode material for a rechargeable lithium battery. It was later successfully exploited as an anode by the lithium-ion battery industry to provide safe, high power but low energy density cells relative to those with graphite/carbon anodes.

    • Michael M. Thackeray
    • Khalil Amine
    Tales of Invention
  • Energy and transportation researchers can contribute to the realization of just transitions to low-carbon mobility in cities across the planet by elaborating and enacting broad conceptions of justice that consider distribution, procedure, recognition and knowledge generation.

    • Tim Schwanen
    Comment
  • Stopping climate change requires revolutionary transformations in industry and agriculture. Ahead of several major climate meetings this year, policymakers struggling to measure progress on climate change should focus less on global emissions, which will be slow to change, and more on technological advances in pioneering niches.

    • Ryan Hanna
    • David G. Victor
    Comment
  • For hydrogen to make a greater impact in our energy systems, attention is required on the integration of new catalysts into fuel cells and their needs in emerging applications, such as heavy-duty transport.

    Editorial
  • LiMn2O4 spinel has a robust structure with a three-dimensional network of channels for fast Li+ conduction. Despite its relatively low electrochemical capacity, LiMn2O4 has found success as a cost-effective and high-power cathode for the Li-ion battery industry.

    • Michael M. Thackeray
    • Khalil Amine
    Tales of Invention
  • The carbonaceous anode was the final important piece of the jigsaw for the first commercialized rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Its original inventor recounts how the search for a research subject led to the breakthrough.

    • Akira Yoshino
    Tales of Invention
  • Our data-sharing policies continually evolve. Here we provide an overview of our current approaches.

    Editorial
  • 11 March 2021 marked the tenth anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Today, without better public engagement and understanding of nuclear power generation and its role in the energy system mix, progress on Japan’s post-carbon strategy will remain stagnant.

    • Midori Aoyagi
    Comment
  • Lithium cobalt oxide was the first commercially successful cathode for the lithium-ion battery mass market. Its success directly led to the development of various layered-oxide compositions that dominate today’s automobile batteries.

    • Arumugam Manthiram
    • John B. Goodenough
    Tales of Invention
  • The milestones in rechargeable lithium-ion battery development have been widely reported but the first-hand accounts from inventors have often not been. We aim to bring their personal stories to wider attention with a new article series.

    Editorial
  • It is now almost 50 years since the first rechargeable lithium batteries, based on the reversible intercalation of lithium into layered structured titanium disulfide, were conceived. They were the precursor to the structurally related layered oxides that now dominate energy storage for electronics, the grid and vehicles.

    • M. Stanley Whittingham
    Tales of Invention
  • We celebrate our fifth birthday this issue, with some reflections on the journey from 2016 to today.

    Editorial
  • To mark the fifth anniversary of Nature Energy, past and present editors share their take on some favourite papers.

    • Changjun (Alex) Zhang
    • Elisa De Ranieri
    • Giulia Tregnago
    Feature
  • Energy research works with units and concepts forged in an age of fossil fuel, leading to problem formulations that reinforce current societal practices and patterns of consumption. Achieving low-carbon energy goals depends on shifting demand to match supply and reconceptualizing interactions between time and energy.

    • Elizabeth Shove
    Comment