Editorials

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  • With moons holding subsurface oceans, the outer planets are back in focus as the most promising places to find life beyond Earth. In addition to future missions, ongoing data analysis from past missions has an important role to play.

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  • In the age of huge telescopes involving many wealthy nations, we mustn’t overlook regional telescopes that help countries address their specific development needs.

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  • The proposed NASA budget promotes space exploration over science, and planetary science over astrophysics. This decision has the potential to cause strife between scientists, who have to work together to find a solution.

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  • Galaxies hosting actively accreting supermassive black holes make up roughly 10% of all galaxies in the Universe. Nevertheless, due to their immense energy output, active galactic nuclei are widely regarded as regulators of their host galaxy growth. But does observational evidence stack up?

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  • More and more private money is pouring into astronomical research and space exploration, and it's not all hype.

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  • As a newcomer to the community, Nature Astronomy covered regional and international scientific and societal issues, discoveries and advances in its first year. We anticipate an equally if not more exciting year to come.

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  • What started 50 years ago as a ‘smudge’ on paper has flourished into a fundamental field of astrophysics replete with unexpected applications and exciting discoveries. To celebrate the discovery of pulsars, we look at the past, present and future of pulsar astrophysics.

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  • It’s finally happened. With the first detection of a neutron star merger by LIGO and Virgo, astronomers have at long last begun the exploration of multi-messenger gravitational-wave astrophysics.

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  • Our inventory of the molecular universe is continually progressing. Our understanding of the astrochemistry behind it will flourish if we are mindful of funding experimental and theoretical efforts as well as observational.

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  • Cassini has been a pinnacle of our quest for the understanding of the space around us. Its end symbolically marks the beginning of a period of relative dearth for Solar System exploration, but planetary science won’t stop thriving.

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  • On 21 August, for those lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time, nothing will happen for a few blissful minutes, and it will mean everything.

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  • With six months behind us, we would like to thank everyone who has submitted a paper, written for us or refereed for us. We take this opportunity to clarify our policies and quell some enduring misconceptions.

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  • Data show that women astronomers face discrimination at all stages of their careers. To ensure true diversity of ideas, everyone, but especially those with privilege, must do something about it.

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  • Scientists are beyond concerned. We are angry about the cuts to fundamental research and the decline in scientific literacy among politicians. But protesting isn't everything — we also need to adapt to change and engage with the public.

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  • Twenty-five years ago, the detection of the first extrasolar planets opened up an area of research that has fascinated both researchers and the general public alike.

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  • We think dark matter exists because measurements of ‘normal’ matter would not otherwise make sense. In this Insight on dark matter — offered jointly by Nature Astronomy and Nature Physics — we showcase the various techniques trying to make sense of it.

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  • Exoplanetary science warns us against the use of improper terminology, which increases the risk of new discoveries being misinterpreted by researchers as well as the general public. Both the scientific community and journal editors can help to avoid this significant danger.

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  • Astronomers, astrophysicists and planetary scientists are global citizens who transcend political boundaries. Nature Astronomy supports a strong, open community with common interests.

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